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Students Take Stab At Designing Ferrari Of The Future

Style and technology fuel a unique contest among international design schools to see who can conceive of the best futuristic model of the famous Italian sports car. Fuel efficiency counts – so does pure power.

Ferrari F430 (ZeroOne)
Ferrari F430 (ZeroOne)

Worldcrunch NEWS BITES

MARANELLO - Designing a new Ferrari model is the dream of any established automobile artiste, not to mention an aspiring design school student.
But students from one of the world's top 50 design schools will get to see their sports car vision to come to life thanks to the World Design Contest, launched by Cavallino design company and Autodesk.

The Italian automaker is looking for a "Ferrari of the Future," which they count on being a hyper-automobile, using the latest materials, technologies and functionalities, to be hyper-everything: light/fast/ecological/technological.

Some 200 projects were submitted to the "Style Center" at Ferrari's northern Italian home of Maranello, including various fuel-efficient designs and even hybrid models. All share a focus on driving performance, and tend not to stray too far from the famous curves of the signature models of the past.

The jury headed by Ferrari president Luca Montezemolo has picked seven finalists among the entries: two from Italy, as well as design schools from London, Barcelona, Seoul, Pune (India) and Detroit. They will now be required to realize their projects with 3D computer technology, with the two winners announced July 17, to receive cash prizes and an internship at Ferrari.

Read the full article in Italian by Piero Bianco

photo - ZeroOne

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