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Japan

Shanghai Subway To Harassed Women: You Had It Coming

Worldcrunch

WANT DAILY (China)

SHANGHAI - There have been numerous recent reports of female passengers being harassed on Shanghai's subway. Instead of acknowledging the complaints and enforcing security measures, the Shanghai subway authority has decided instead to post a photo of a woman wearing a transparent dress clearly showing her underwear on its website.

The photo's caption said: "If you takes the subway dressed like this, it's no wonder you get harassed. Since there are so many big bad wolves on the subway, girls should behave themselves!"

This quickly sparked serious controversy, as Chinese netizen outrage denounced the subway company's blaming the victim.

The "Voice of the Feminist" movement responded to the provocation by stating, "Women should be able to own their bodies. The subway company should take a stand against sexual harassment". This week, two volunteers from the feminist group protested on the subway with a board that read, "I may be hot, but you can't harass me", the Want Daily newspaper reported.

A man called Buddy said in his blog that "If the notion takes hold that women who wear less have only themselves to blame if they tempt males to commit crime , the end result will be that a woman won't be allowed out unless she covers herself from head to toe."

Joe, another blogger asked if "according to the subway company, does this mean that me are allowed to harass women at the swimming pool?"

Others, however, defended the Shanghai metro authority, saying an appropriate dress code in public is common sense.

Photo - Weibo/xiangqi119

Photo - via Want Daily

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Geopolitics

End-Of-Regime Vibe? Supreme Leader Keeps Referring To Shah's Final Days

In recent weeks, Ali Khamenei, Iran's Supreme Leader, has made repeated references to the end of Iran's last regime in 1979. Is may be a sign the country is indeed approaching another kind of revolution.

photo of Supreme Leader ali Khamenei

Iran's Supreme Leader al Khamenei on Jan. 9

Office of Supreme Leader via ZUMA
Kayhan-London

-Analysis-

Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has ordered his forces to clamp down with renewed vigor on the remains of the mass protests that erupted across Iran in mid-September. Initially a reaction to police brutality, these turned into the biggest anti-state protests of the Islamic Republic's 40-year history.

And they continue, in spite of thousands of arrests, more than 500 deaths on the streets and in custody, and four hangings. There was also outrage in Britain and across the world after the execution of British-Iranian Alireza Akbari, who had been sentenced to death.

All of this has angered the leader. In a speech in Tehran last week, Khamenei called the protests "treason" aimed at destroying Iran's "security, production of knowledge, economic output and tourism."

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