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LA STAMPA

Oh What Shall We Buy Today On eBay? How About A Village In Tuscany

Here's one way to try to get elected mayor - buy yourself a village. And thanks to eBay, you can make an offer with a click of your mouse.

Want to make a bid on the Borgo? (pelletica)
Want to make a bid on the Borgo? (pelletica)
STIA - It's time to add "Tuscan village" to the list of stuff you can buy on eBay. Facing a stalled Italian real estate market, the owners of the small village of Pratariccia are hoping to sell it to the highest bidder on the U.S.-based online auction exchange website.

For 50 years, Pratariccia, a hamlet in the municipality of Stia, located 40 kilometers away from Florence, has stood abandoned -- see the video below for proof. Now, you can buy its 25 deserted houses on the edge of wooded countryside and near historical abbeys. Original starting price: 2.5 million euros.

"The village is property of several owners who live in Tuscany and who have tried to sell it for years. Maybe this time they'll finally succeed," said the Mayor of Stia, Luca Santini. Several businessmen have already been in touch with the municipality and have pitched projects to renovate the village. Despite being badly rundown, a village in the heart of Tuscany is attractive property. But as usual for this well-protected region, strict zoning laws will apply.

Selling villages or small towns online is not that uncommon anymore. In the U.S. it happened, among others, for Waucunda, Washington, and Albert, Texas. In 2010 in Italy, the managers of San Basile, a village in the Calabria region, launched a website to sell vacant houses with asking prices that started from 5,000 Euros. Thousands of people from Italy and abroad made offers on that village. The bids are just now coming in for Pratariccia.

Read more from La Stampa in Italian.

*This is a digest, not a direct translation. Original article by Pierangelo Sapegno

Photo - pelletica

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Ideas

How To Stop Thinking About Russia — A Message From Eastern Europe To The West

David Stulik, senior research analyst at the Prague-based European Values Research Center, explains the risks of continuing to calculate all our choices according to hypothetical fears of and future compromises with Russia.

photo of a man carrying a ukrainian flag at a rally in Warsaw

A pro-Ukrainian rally in Warsaw, Poland

Attila Husejnow/SOPA Images via ZUMA

-Analysis-

KYIV — There’s a school of thought among some in Europe that the energy crisis is due to the war “between Ukraine and Russia,” not because of Putin’s invasion of Ukraine. It’s a subtle, but important difference in language — and one that reveals the partial success of Russia's non-stop propaganda and disinformation campaign.

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Even some very pro-Ukraine politicians consistently use the phrase “the war in Ukraine” for saying what caused energy prices to increase, or why household incomes in the West are going to drop.

It is of course unfair to blame Ukraine for these problems.

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