When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

LA STAMPA

Mentally-Disabled Boy In Italy Denied Communion For 'Not Understanding' Rite

Near the northern city of Ferrara, a priest has denied communion to a mentally-disabled child, saying that it can only be offered to those who "understand the mystery" of the rite. The parents are taking their case to the European Court

A church in Ferrara, Italy (Danilo Mistroni)
A church in Ferrara, Italy (Danilo Mistroni)
Giacomo Galeazzi

FERRARA – Controversy has erupted both inside and outside the Catholic Church after a parish priest in northern Italy refused to offer communion to a disabled child. Father Piergiorgio Zaghi of the Immaculate Conception church in Porto Garibaldi, a village near Ferrara, denied the sacrament at Easter mass, saying that the mentally-disabled boy was unable to "understand the mystery of the Eucharist."

The parents of the boy in the Emilia-Romagna region have taken their case both to the European Court of Human Rights and to the higher authorities at the Holy See in Rome.

Antonio Marziale, a sociologist and head of the Children's Rights Observatory as well as a consultant for the Italian Parliamentary Committee for Childhood, denounced the denial of the rite as "cultural obscurantism from the Middle Ages."

Parishioners are divided between those who share the priest's view and those who disagree, and are calling for Pope Benedict XVI to weigh in and defend the right of the mentally disabled to receive the sacrament. A boy who attends catechism classes with the disabled child wrote a letter to the priest: "If he was with us, it would be a great joy for him, and we would see the actual value of Communion."

In Rome, Cardinal Velasio De Paolis denounced the priest's decision, noting that in the Eastern Rite churches children receive the Eucharist soon after their christening. "As long as the disabled person does not desecrate the host, if they receive it calmly, it is normal practice to offer it to them," De Paolis said. "Never have I denied host", and above all, "the strength of the sacrament also touches the ill and the dying."

Backed by bishop

Claudia, the mother of the child, still hopes that Father Zaghi will "think again" about his decision. She said her son enjoyed the catechism class to prepare for the taking of communion. "Of course his degree of attention was not like his classmates," she said. As for her son's "understanding of the Eucharist," she said that "I don't like to say it but – even a ‘normal" 10-year-old child cannot fully understand the concept."

The family's attorneys will argue that "Canon law does not mention either the age or the mental abilities of the recipient of the Eucharist." They also highlight that "although this child is indeed living with major motor disabilities, by law he is not completely unable to understand the significance of the sacrament."

The first communion ceremony is to be held in May and will involve about 20 children. The boy's family is confident that this gives enough time for the priest to change course, although so far the bishop of Ferrara has backed the parish priest. "I hope that my son will be able to have the communion with all his friends," Claudia said. "They want to celebrate the ceremony with us. They stand in solidarity."

Read the original article in Italian

Photo - Danilo Mistroni

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

"Welcome To Our Hell..." Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba Speaks

In a rare in-depth interview, Ukraine's top diplomat didn't hold back as he discussed NATO, E.U. candidacy, and the future of the war with Russia. He also reserves a special 'thank you' for Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi.

Dmytro Kuleba, Foreign Minister of Ukraine attends the summit of foreign ministers of the G7 group of leading democratic economic powers.

Oleg Bazar

KYIV — This is the first major interview Ukrainian Minister of Foreign Affairs Dmytro Kuleba has given. He spoke to the Ukrainian publication Livy Bereg about NATO, international assistance and confrontation with Russia — on the frontline and in the offices of the European Parliament.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

At 41, Kuleba is the youngest ever foreign minister of Ukraine. He is the former head of the Commission for Coordination of Euro-Atlantic Integration and initiated Ukraine's accession to the European Green Deal. The young but influential pro-European politician is now playing a complicated political game in order to attract as many foreign partners as possible to support Ukraine not only in the war, but also when the war ends.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ