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China

Meet China's Most Open Party Leader

Both by what he says and what he blogs, Chinese politician Zhang Chunxian appears to want to truly hear from the people he's charged to lead. But he may have pushed his luck by posting messages on his microblog account directly from inside a Comm

Zhang Chunxian (E.O.)
Zhang Chunxian (E.O.)


BEIJING - From the transport ministry to Hunan party secretary then boss for the restive region of Xinjiang, Zhang Chunxian's every promotion is tracked by Chinese journalists. But in certain circles, Zhang is best known as the highest-ranking official in China to communicate directly through a Twitter-like microblogging platform.

Hong Kong's media christened him "the most open secretary" in China, and he's known to Internet users as the "online secretary." But the 300,000 people who follow his account on the microblog Tencent Weibo haven't heard from him in nearly a year. On March 18, he announced a break from tweeting, shortly after the conclusion of China's most closely-watched political event, the so-called two sessions of the National People's Congress where he garnered headlines by tweeting from within the proceedings.

During the congress, he also sent a message of congratulation to Alim Halik, a Xinjiang-born lamb kebab seller who was getting married. Halik had previously impressed Zhang by donating 100,000 yuan ($16,000) - most of his profits for the last eight years – to support poor students and, with Zhang's endorsement, had been voted Person of the Year for 2010 in an internet poll organized by state news agency Xinhua.

In April 2010, when Zhang arrived in Xinjiang, the region had been cut off from the Internet for ten months in the aftermath of rioting by Uighurs, the ethnic group to which Alim Halik belongs.

Zhang had restored the region's Internet access on May 14. While in charge of Hunan, a province in central China, he promoted the Web as a "channel to listen to public opinions, to pool people's wisdom and solve their problems."

He has been canvassing opinions online since 2006, when he incorporated Internet users' suggestions in his report for the 9th Party Congress of Hunan Province. The following year, he registered under his real name on Rednet, a well-known local blogging forum. He later posted an official New Year greeting and has made online statements at the beginning of every year since.

He has also heeded other online suggestions, for example by demolishing a coal chimney at the headquarters of the Hunan Provincial Party Committee in 2008.

Hand-in-hand

Zhang opened his microblog, or weibo, March 2, 2011, where he was identified as "Zhang Chunxian, a member of the 17th CPC Central Committee, the secretary of the Party committee of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region and the first political commissar of the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps."

He began with a letter, promising to "walk hand-in-hand" with Xinjiang people on weibo. Unlike many other officials with weibo accounts, Zhang maintained his personally, and within a day of signing up, he had received 5,000 messages and comments. He told journalists that he had read them all and stayed up late for four days answering.

His replies addressed questions about education, technology, employment, social security, housing and prices, and he sought to realize changes, referring many of the grievances that he heard to the relevant government departments.

One such comment came from Wang Jinfang, a farmer near the border with Kazakhstan, who felt cheated after selling her grain for a price far lower than the one she saw on the invoice from her country's grain bureau. After Zhang's intervention she promptly received a written answer from the bureau.

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Green Or Gone

Tracking The Asian Fishing "Armada" That Sucks Up Tons Of Seafood Off Argentina's Coast

A brightly-lit flotilla of fishing ships has reappeared in international waters off the southern coast of Argentina as it has annually in recent years for an "industrial harvest" of thousands of tons of fish and shellfish.

Photo of dozens of crab traps

An estimated 500 boats gather annually off the coast of Patagonia

Claudio Andrade

BUENOS AIRES — The 'floating city' of industrial fishing boats has returned, lighting up a long stretch of the South Pacific.

Recently visible off the coast of southern Argentina, aerial photographs showed the well-lit armada of some 500 vessels, parked 201 miles offshore from Comodoro Rivadavia in the province of Chubut. The fleet had arrived for its vast seasonal haul of sea 'products,' confirming its annual return to harvest squid, cod and shellfish on a scale that activists have called an environmental blitzkrieg.

In principle the ships are fishing just outside Argentina's exclusive Economic Zone, though it's widely known that this kind of apparent "industrial harvest" does not respect the territorial line, entering Argentine waters for one reason or another.

For some years now, activists and organizations like Greenpeace have repeatedly denounced industrial-style fishing as exhausting marine resources worldwide and badly affecting regional fauna, even if the fishing outfits technically manage to evade any crackdown by staying in or near international waters.

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