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LA STAMPA

In Europe, Women's Shoe Style Choices Reflect National Identities

French women buy more shoes each year than their other European counterparts. But what KIND of shoes says even more. Italian women are more apt to go for high heels...and others?

(Maegan Tintari)
(Maegan Tintari)

LA STAMPA/Worldcrunch*

From Cinderella to the girls of Sex and The City, women have always been obsessed with shoes. That obsession, it seems, extends all around the word, even if the kind and style of shoes might change. Now, a new survey attempts to quantify and qualify the links between nationality and footwear.

For starters, American women buy more shoes than Europeans, according to data by National Trade Sources and Research specialists, Euromonitor, Mintel, in a survey commissioned by Spartoo.com, a European online retailer of footwear.

Among Europeans, French women buy the largest number of shoes: an average of six pairs of shoes a year. A pair of smart stilettos, maybe by Christian Louboutin, ballerinas, like the favorite of the former first lady Carla Bruni, are de rigueur in a fashionable French closet.

English women buy an average of 5.4 pairs of shoes a year. They wear the brands Pretty Ballerinas and Manolo Blahnik, like the super model Kate Moss does, but also something more rock and punk, often with studs. Dr.Martens boots are always trendy in the UK.

Italian women (who buy an average of 5.2 pairs a year) go crazy for high heels. An Italian fashionista would easily wear 5-inch stilettos even for a simple happy hour. On the other hand, Northern Europeans are more sporty. In Holland and Belgium women buy mainly comfortable sneakers.

Read more in Italian from La Stampa. Original article by Roselina Salemi

Photo - Maegan Tintari

*This is a digest item, not a direct translation

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Society

Facing Down The "Violence Stigma" Of Mental Health Illness

Sensationalist TV coverage and even experts still often link mental health struggles and violent crimes, even though people with mental health difficulties commit fewer crimes comparatively. It's time to end the stigma.

Photo of two wooden figurines

Wooden figurines

Sara R. Gallardo

People like me who have mental health disorders suffer more violence than we inflict on others, yet we continue to carry the stigma of being unpredictable and aggressive individuals.

In the "events" section of a morning TV program I saw, for example, there was some news with sensationalist overtones. The first was about a son who had killed his father and the second was about an individual who had beaten another and left him in a coma.

The journalistic decisions in the presentation and commentary of both events were as follows: in the first case, the alleged perpetrator must necessarily have "mental disorders" to justify his conduct. But in the second case, it was not "necessary" to jump to that conclusion because the information focused on the bad reputation of the alleged aggressor, nicknamed "The Nazi".

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