When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

LA STAMPA

In Europe, Women's Shoe Style Choices Reflect National Identities

French women buy more shoes each year than their other European counterparts. But what KIND of shoes says even more. Italian women are more apt to go for high heels...and others?

(Maegan Tintari)
(Maegan Tintari)

LA STAMPA/Worldcrunch*

From Cinderella to the girls of Sex and The City, women have always been obsessed with shoes. That obsession, it seems, extends all around the word, even if the kind and style of shoes might change. Now, a new survey attempts to quantify and qualify the links between nationality and footwear.

For starters, American women buy more shoes than Europeans, according to data by National Trade Sources and Research specialists, Euromonitor, Mintel, in a survey commissioned by Spartoo.com, a European online retailer of footwear.

Among Europeans, French women buy the largest number of shoes: an average of six pairs of shoes a year. A pair of smart stilettos, maybe by Christian Louboutin, ballerinas, like the favorite of the former first lady Carla Bruni, are de rigueur in a fashionable French closet.

English women buy an average of 5.4 pairs of shoes a year. They wear the brands Pretty Ballerinas and Manolo Blahnik, like the super model Kate Moss does, but also something more rock and punk, often with studs. Dr.Martens boots are always trendy in the UK.

Italian women (who buy an average of 5.2 pairs a year) go crazy for high heels. An Italian fashionista would easily wear 5-inch stilettos even for a simple happy hour. On the other hand, Northern Europeans are more sporty. In Holland and Belgium women buy mainly comfortable sneakers.

Read more in Italian from La Stampa. Original article by Roselina Salemi

Photo - Maegan Tintari

*This is a digest item, not a direct translation

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!

China's President Xi Jinping attends a meeting with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin

Alexander Demianchuk/TASS (Photo montage/Worldcrunch)
Anna Akage, Meike Eijsberg, Shaun Lavelle and Emma Albright

Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese leader Xi Jinping met on Thursday at a summit in Uzbekistan, their first face-to-face encounter since Russia’s Feb. 24 invasion of Ukraine.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

The meeting comes as Russia is reeling from major Ukraine advances on the ground in the six-month-old war, and with the Western alliance holding firm in its support of Kyiv. In their meeting, Russia state media reported that Putin told Xi Jinping he appreciated China’s “balanced position” regarding the conflict in Ukraine. The Kremlin leader also condemned U.S. “provocations” in the Taiwan Strait.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ