Worldcrunch

El Financiero reported this week that child labor abuses affect at least three million kids in Mexico: long workdays, minimal or no payment, informal jobs, and more blatent abuse are constant factors in their daily lives.

The last official numbers on underage workers were released in 2011 and indicated that about 870,000 boys and girls between 6 and 13 years-old -- about 5% of Mexican kids in this age group -- participated in some sort of labor activity.

By law, the minimum working age in Mexico is 14. Child labor in Mexico increases with age as school attendance decreases. Two out of every three children in the above age group in 2011 worked in unpaid jobs, both within a family setting and outside. Children who were 12 to 13 years-old worked for an average 19 hours per week.

The children who worked and didn't attend school spent on average 33 hours each week laboring. Kids between 14 and 17 years-old worked an average 40 hours per week, similar to the hours of most adults, often under illegal labor conditions.

Child labor isn't just going on in Mexico. The International Labor Organization has estimated that as many as 120 million underage workers between the ages of five and 14 are exploited.

Explore our Mondo Map to learn more about child labor around the world.

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Geopolitics

Putin Psychology 101: The World Tries To Get Inside Russian Leader’s Head

Experts in geopolitics and the workings of world leaders have accelerated a two-decade long quest to understand the motivations of the enigmatic man in the Kremlin.

Vladimir Putin during the president's annual press conference in Russia

Kremlin.ru
Anna Akage

PARISVladimir Putin’s origin story, fed by Russian propaganda into the Western media, centers around his rise to lead Russia after a strategic KGB posting in the closing years of the Cold War. Understanding his current geopolitical ambitions would thus require that we imagine the mindset of a Soviet spymaster ready to manipulate world politics for the past two decades as he attempts to build a new Russian empire.

But what if Putin was nothing more than a desk clerk in his late 1980s posting in the eastern German city of Dresden? If the young functionary was simply a convenient tool plucked by the circle of oligarchs formed around then Russian president Boris Yeltsin to secure their own status? That indeed is the reading from influential Russian blogger and political analyst Maxim Katz, who last year exposed recently declassified documents that Putin was a minor player who went by the codename of “Moth” — not a bear or tiger, or even a hamster!

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