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El Financiero reported this week that child labor abuses affect at least three million kids in Mexico: long workdays, minimal or no payment, informal jobs, and more blatent abuse are constant factors in their daily lives.

The last official numbers on underage workers were released in 2011 and indicated that about 870,000 boys and girls between 6 and 13 years-old -- about 5% of Mexican kids in this age group -- participated in some sort of labor activity.

By law, the minimum working age in Mexico is 14. Child labor in Mexico increases with age as school attendance decreases. Two out of every three children in the above age group in 2011 worked in unpaid jobs, both within a family setting and outside. Children who were 12 to 13 years-old worked for an average 19 hours per week.

The children who worked and didn't attend school spent on average 33 hours each week laboring. Kids between 14 and 17 years-old worked an average 40 hours per week, similar to the hours of most adults, often under illegal labor conditions.

Child labor isn't just going on in Mexico. The International Labor Organization has estimated that as many as 120 million underage workers between the ages of five and 14 are exploited.

Explore our Mondo Map to learn more about child labor around the world.

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Coronavirus

Texas In Germany? Saxony Mixes Anti-Vaxxers And Far-Right Politics

When it comes to vaccination rates, there are striking parallels between Germany and the United States. The states with the most opposition to vaccines differ politically from those with the highest vaccination rates. Now the consequences for booster shots are starting to become visible, especially in the United States.

A protest in Saxony last year against COVID-19 restrictions

Zentralbild/dpa via ZUMA
Daniel Friedrich Sturm

-Analysis-

WASHINGTON — Ok, so Saxony was singled out last week in a New York Times article as an example of the disastrous vaccination situation in parts of Europe. The article talks about the link between anti-vaxxers and the political success of the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) party in the eastern German state.

In a sense, Saxony is Germany's Texas. For instance, 59% of U.S. citizens are fully vaccinated, but in strictly Republican Texas, where Donald Trump overwhelmingly won the 2020 election, this figure stands at 54%.

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