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Germany

German S&M Sex Workers Accused Of Prepping Clients With Addictive Painkillers

Munich police have raided several “studios” where prostitutes are believed to have administered powerful painkillers before performing intense sadomasochistic services. The studio cost one client 70,000 euros a year, after he became more hooked on the dru

German S&M Sex Workers Accused Of Prepping Clients With Addictive Painkillers
Susi Wimmer

MUNICH – For the past several months, Munich police have been investigating sex workers accused of injecting consenting clients with a local anesthetic before performing particularly painful sadomasochistic practices. Some clients may have even become addicted to the substance.

On Monday, police carried out raids on various "studios," where they arrested several prostitutes and seized hundreds of bottles of Procaine, the anesthetic in question. Procaine is used in dentistry and cancer treatment.

One 45-year-old Munich man spent more than 70,000 euros in the studios over the past year and a half. After a few "sessions' he became so addicted to the anesthetic that he sold his car and took out loans to feed his dependence. He ended up going to the police, who were already investigating two studios and several apartments in the city and surrounding area since the beginning of the year. Police claim the prostitutes not only injected Procaine under clients' skin but, in some cases, directly into their veins.

A 47-year-old man linked to one of the dominatrixes said the prostitutes would inject the drug before the start of a session. It made "special" practices bearable, indeed even possible. During the sessions, the sex workers had to top up the shots one or more times on their more or less conscious clients.

Aside from being dangerous in itself, intravenous delivery of Procaine in significant doses can have long-term physical and mental health consequences, and is sometimes fatal. In addition, the Procaine administered by the sex workers was part of a "drug cocktail" that either enhanced or watered down its effects with unknown consequences.

During the Monday raids, police found large quantities of Procaine in the studios and apartments. One 34-year-old worker had 100 bottles in her possession; a 42-year-old had a supply of 145 bottles. The police also found 10,000 euros in cash during the raids.

The six prostitutes and the 47-year-old man were released after questioning. They are being charged with causing grievous bodily harm, illegally administering injections (only medically trained personnel may give shots) and tampering with medication. It is unclear where they acquired the Procaine; however, depending on the manufacturer, it is not always a prescription drug in Germany.

Read the original story in German

Photo - ricoeurian

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