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SUEDDEUTSCHE ZEITUNG, SUDWEST PRESSE, RHEINISCHE POST, BERLINER ZEITUNG (Germany)

Worldcrunch

Germany’s Minister of Education and Research, Prof. Dr. Annette Schavan, has criticized the University of Düsseldorf for allegedly informing the press about the results of a report on plagiarism in her doctoral thesis before she herself had been informed of the existence of the report.

"I won’t stand for it," she toldSüdwest Presse. "I now have no other option but to defend myself.”

Earlier this year, following allegations by an anonymous blogger that Schavan had plagiarized parts of her PHD dissertation -- written 32 years ago and entitled "Person and Conscience -- Studies on Conditions, Need and Requirements of Today's Consciences" -- the University opened an investigation.

The Rheinische Post quoted Schavan as saying: "At no time during work on my dissertation did I attempt to deceive."

This is not the conclusion reached by University examiners. Süddeutsche Zeitungsays the analysis states that the thesis presents "a characteristic picture of a plagiaristic modus operandi.” According to the report, text segments on 60 pages of the 351-page document show evidence of plagiarism.

"It’s a tight situation," said the Berliner Zeitung, noting that the allegations were now no longer those of an anonymous blogger but an official University position.

Dr. Ernst Dieter Rossmann, a Social Democrat Member of Parliament, said that should Schavan be stripped of her doctorate she should resign her ministerial post.

Green faction leader Renate Künast added that "the credibility that Schavan needs to lead the Ministry successfully has already been lost." Künast told the Rheinische Post that it was "shameful that Schavan wants to sit this out."

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The Many Paradoxes Of Cuba's Eternal Milk Shortages

Milk shortages are not new in Cuba, where the state pays producers less for their milk of what they can gain by selling it on the black market.

A young girl drinks milk inside her home in Cienfuegos, Cuba

Sadiel Mederos Bermudez

HAVANA — "There is no milk" ceased to be a repeated phrase on the island, because everyone knows it and, probably, by now they have resigned themselves.

Children under seven and the elderly with medical diets don’t receive it with the necessary frequency, even if they are the only sectors of the population with the right to acquire it through a government subsidy.

Because there simply is no milk in Cuba.

The rest of Cubans must buy it in stores in freely convertible currency (MLC). However, powdered or fluid milk hasn't been available in stores in MLC for months. Last time, at the beginning of the year, the price of a bag of 1 to 1.2 kilograms was between 6 and 8 MLC ($6-8).

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