Germany

Frankfurt Becomes First Major German City Since Nazi Era To Elect A Jewish Mayor

A surprise victory turns the keys to Frankfurt city hall over to Peter Feldmann, the German city's first Jewish mayor since 1933.

Frankfurt's mayor elect, Peter Feldmann (YouTube)
Frankfurt's mayor elect, Peter Feldmann (YouTube)

*NEWSBITES

FRANKFURT – Frankfurt has elected its first Jewish mayor since 1933, marking the first time since the Nazi era that a major German city will be led by a Jew.

Social Democrat Peter Feldmann, 53, surprised local observers by tallying 57.4% of the vote, taking Frankfurt's city hall out of the hands of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party for the first time in 17 years. "This is a big, big surprise," Feldman said. "Nobody, including me, expected this."

The city councilman ran on a platform strong on social themes including fighting child poverty and adequate elder care and low-income housing.

A political scientist and former director of an elderly care facility, Feldmann spent two years at a kibbutz in Israel during his youth. First analyses of the poll results show that voters in multicultural Frankfurt disliked his CDU opponent, Boris Rhein, who is known as a "law and order" man.

The new mayor will have to demonstrate considerable savvy to get around controversy that has already manifested over his announced plans to raise a local commercial tax and levy a so-called "bed tax" on hotels.

Read the full story in German by Hannelore Crolly

Photo - YouTube

*Newsbites are digest items, not direct translations

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Geopolitics

In Sudan, A Surprise About-Face Marks Death Of The Revolution

Ousted Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok was the face of the "stolen revolution". The fact that he accepted, out of the blue, to return at the same position, albeit on different footing, opens the door to the final legitimization of the coup.

Sudanese protesters demonstrating against the military regime in London on Nov. 20, 2021

Nesrine Malik

A little over a month ago, a military coup in Sudan ended a military-civilian partnership established after the 2019 revolution that removed President Omar al-Bashir after almost 30 years in power. The army arrested the Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and, along with several of his cabinet and other civil government officials, threw him in detention. In the weeks that followed, the Sudanese military and their partners in power, the Rapid Support Forces, moved quickly.

They reappointed a new government of “technocrats” (read “loyalists”), shut down internet services, and violently suppressed peaceful protests against the coup and its sabotaging of the 2019 revolution. During those weeks, Hamdok remained the symbol of the stolen revolution, betrayed by the military, detained illegally, unable to communicate with the people who demanded his return. In his figure, the moral authority of the counter-coup resided.

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