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Five Things That Happened At The 2013 Golden Globes

Worldcrunch

LOS ANGELES - The 70th Golden Globes ceremony took place Sunday night in Los Angeles, bringing together Television and Cinema... surprise and predictability. Here's what happened:

1. After being snubbed at the Oscar nominations, Ben Affleck's drama "Argo" about the hostage crisis in Iran, won Best Picture, Drama, (and Director) beating tough competition from Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln." Daniel Day Lewis did beat Ben Affleck though in the Best Actor category.

2. The gal-pal hosts, Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, were full of quips and good cheer. After the last three years of Ricky Gervais roasting many of the celebrities attending, the two friends' somewhat lighter bantering was well received.

“Ricky Gervais could not be here tonight because he is no longer technically in show business.
– Tina Fey

3. Jodie Foster finally publicly came out. Or did she announce her retirement? During her confusing acceptance speech for a lifetime achievement award, CNN reports that Jodie said "I guess I have a sudden urge to say something that I've never really been able to air in public," she began after the requisite thank-yous.

"So, a declaration that I'm a little nervous about but maybe not quite as nervous as my publicist right now, huh Jennifer? But I'm just going to put it out there, right? Loud and proud, right? So I'm going to need your support on this. … This feels like the end of one era and the beginning of something else. Scary and exciting and now what? Well, I may never be up on this stage again, on any stage for that matter," she said.

"Good night - we’re going home with Jodie Foster!"
– Amy Poehler ended the show

4. The 42nd U.S. President introduced the 16th U.S. President. Former President Bill Clinton introduced the clip for Best Movie nominee, "Lincoln," saying of the film that it was "A tough fight to push a bill through a bitterly divided House of Representatives. Winning required the president to make a lot of unsavory deals that had nothing to do with the big issue. I wouldn't know anything about that."

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"Wow, what an exciting special guest! That was Hillary Clinton's husband!" - Amy Poelher

5. Movies and TV shows about the CIA were the winning ticket for this year's awards. "Homeland" won best Drama Series, plus both Best Actor and Actress in a Drama Series for Damien Lewis and Claire Danes. "Argo" won Best Drama Picture and Director for Ben Affleck – while Jessica Chastain won Best Actress, drama for "Zero Dark Thirty." Will the CIA theme continue on for the next few years?

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I like Homeland, but I don’t think it’s as good as that other show, "Previously On Homeland." That thing is action-packed.” – Tina Fey

via Tumbler

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Geopolitics

Smaller Allies Matter: Afghanistan Offers Hard Lessons For Ukraine's Future

Despite controversies at home, Nordic countries were heavily involved in the NATO-led war in Afghanistan. As the Ukraine war grinds on, lessons from that conflict are more relevant than ever.

Photo of Finnish Defence Forces in Afghanistan

Finnish Defence Forces in Afghanistan

Johannes Jauhiainen

-Analysis-

HELSINKI — In May 2021, the Taliban took back power in Afghanistan after 20 years of international presence, astronomical sums of development aid and casualties on all warring sides.

As Kabul fell, a chaotic evacuation prompted comparisons to the fall of Saigon — and most of the attention was on the U.S., which had led the original war to unseat the Taliban after 9/11 and remained by far the largest foreign force on the ground. Yet, the fall of Kabul was also a tumultuous and troubling experience for a number of other smaller foreign countries who had been presented for years in Afghanistan.

In an interview at the time, Antti Kaikkonen, the Finnish Minister of Defense, tried to explain what went wrong during the evacuation.

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“Originally we anticipated that the smaller countries would withdraw before the Americans. Then it became clear that getting people to the airport had become more difficult," Kaikkonen said. "So we decided last night to bring home our last soldiers who were helping with the evacuation.”

During the 20-year-long Afghan war, the foreign troop presence included many countries:Finland committed around 2,500 soldiers,Sweden 8,000,Denmark 12,000 and Norway 9,000. And in the nearly two years since the end of the war, Finland,Belgium and theNetherlands have commissioned investigations into their engagements in Afghanistan.

As the number of fragile or failed states around the world increases, it’s important to understand how to best organize international development aid and the security of such countries. Twenty years of international engagement in Afghanistan offers valuable lessons.

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