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Spain

El Jefe And The Indignados - Springsteen Salutes Spain's Protesters

EL MUNDO (Spain)

SEVILLA - Veteran American rocker Bruce Springsteen kicked off his European tour Sunday night in Sevilla with a special nod to Spain's indignados, a grassroots movement launched in 2011 to protest austerity measures and high unemployment.

Addressing the crowd of some 30,000 in Spanish, the 62-year-old musician dedicated one of his new tracks, Jack Of All Trades, to the indignados and others who "are fighting hard here in the south of Spain," El Mundo reported.

"Too many people have lost their jobs and their homes," he said. "Here in Europe, the tough times are even worse. Our hearts are with you."

"The Boss," as Springsteen is known, told reporters before the concert that he wanted to see politics that included "more Socialism for the tycoons and more capitalism for everyone else."

"You've got it rough in Spain," he added. "We in the United States are in recession, but you are in a real depression."

Springsteen's tour of Europe will extend for more than two months, wrapping up with a show in Helsinki, Finland on July 31.

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