CHINA DAILY, SOUTHERN METROPOLIS DAILY (China)

Worldcrunch

GUANGZHOU – An organization of parents of gay and lesbians in China has sent an open letter to China’s National People’s Congress (NPC), demanding the legalization of same-sex marriage, according to the Southern Metropolis Daily.

“Some of our children have been living with their partners for nearly 10 years. They love each other, but they cannot sign their names legally when their partners need an operation,” said the letter written by PFLAG China (Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays of China), a Guangzhou-based organization that promotes LGBT rights and supports gay parents.

The letter underlines the problems that gay couples in China are facing, such as adoption, inheritance and purchasing properties. It also calls for an early amendment of the Marriage Law to include the right of gay marriage.

“We strongly request that National People's Congress delegates and Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference committee members give their attention to this matter... so that China’s 60 million homosexual citizens can have an equal right to marry,” concludes the letter.

In China, one of the only ways to protest legally is to write a petition or a letter of complaint to the State Bureau for Letters and Calls and wait for a response. According to China Daily, between 2003 and 2007 over 10 million petitions were handled annually.

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Geopolitics

In Sudan, A Surprise About-Face Marks Death Of The Revolution

Ousted Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok was the face of the "stolen revolution". The fact that he accepted, out of the blue, to return at the same position, albeit on different footing, opens the door to the final legitimization of the coup.

Sudanese protesters demonstrating against the military regime in London on Nov. 20, 2021

Nesrine Malik

A little over a month ago, a military coup in Sudan ended a military-civilian partnership established after the 2019 revolution that removed President Omar al-Bashir after almost 30 years in power. The army arrested the Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and, along with several of his cabinet and other civil government officials, threw him in detention. In the weeks that followed, the Sudanese military and their partners in power, the Rapid Support Forces, moved quickly.

They reappointed a new government of “technocrats” (read “loyalists”), shut down internet services, and violently suppressed peaceful protests against the coup and its sabotaging of the 2019 revolution. During those weeks, Hamdok remained the symbol of the stolen revolution, betrayed by the military, detained illegally, unable to communicate with the people who demanded his return. In his figure, the moral authority of the counter-coup resided.

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