XINHUA (China), VOICE OF AMERICA (USA), REUTERS

Worldcrunch

BEIJING - Chinese legislature has passed a law that includes mandatory real-name registration for Internet users, Xinhua reported on Friday.

The new rules were announced by the official Xinhua news agency on Twitter:

Rules approved Friday in China to enhance protection of personal info online and safeguard public interests twitter.com/XHNews/status/…

— Xinhua News Agency (@XHNews) Décembre 28, 2012


Chinese authorities and Internet companies like Sina Corp have been working together to censor and monitor what people say online. But the government has now put measures such as deleting posts into law, reports Reuters.

"The law should escort the development of the internet to protect people's interest," Communist Party mouthpiece the People's Daily said in a front page commentary, reports Voice of America. "Only that way can our Internet be healthier, more cultured and safer."

The Chinese government says that tighter monitoring of the Internet is required to prevent people making malicious and anonymous accusations online, disseminating pornography and spreading panic with unfounded rumors, reports Reuters.

These new restrictions follow a series of corruption scandals amongst lower-level officials exposed by Internet users.

Earlier this year, the government began forcing users of Sina Corp's popular Weibo microblogging platform to register their real names.

Popular foreign sites Facebook, Twitter and Google-owned YouTube are blocked in China.

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Society

"You Ass Tulip!" - What Turkey's Creative Swearing Culture Can Teach Us

Profanity is a kind of national sport in Turkey. But it can also be risky business, sometimes leading to lawsuits or even death. One political scientist researching Turkey’s unique way of conjuring curse words explains what the country's inventive slurs reveal about its fears and prejudices.

Street scene in Istanbul

Marion Sendker

ISTANBUL — “Take your mother and get lost!” That’s the literal translation of what Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the authoritarian Turkish president, once said to a farmer 15 years ago when the man complained about economic problems.

The Turkish people were shocked by his choice of words, but it was the farmer who was led away by police and later forced to make a televised apology. As he recently explained in a newspaper interview, he is still dealing with legal proceedings as a result of the incident because he is accused of insulting the president, not the other way round.

Erdogan’s behavior was certainly unusual for a head of state, but many Turks also saw it as honest and authentic. “In Turkey, working-class people often use rude words, which are seen as more straightforward and sincere,” explains Ahmet Özcan, a political scientist at Istanbul’s Boğaziçi University, who is currently working on a research project about Turkish slang.

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