Germany

Car-Loving Germans On The Road To Giving Up Their Wheels

Strongest among the under-30s, the trend of Germans renouncing car ownership has touched all age groups. Autos are increasingly a practical choice rather than status symbol.

Berlin: where autos and public transport meet (Susa Tom)
Berlin: where autos and public transport meet (Susa Tom)

Worldcrunch NEWS BITES

DIE WELT

BERLIN - Cars are playing ever less of a central role in the way young Germans script their lives. "They pack less of a punch as status symbols," says Andreas Knie of the Berlin Innovation Center for Mobility and Social Change. "The attitude towards cars and mobility is getting much more matter-of-fact.""

Knie, who spoke at the "Safe Car of Tomorrow"" symposium in Berlin, an event hosted by the German Traffic Safety Council, says that people increasingly make the conscious decision not to own a car.

The numbers tell the story. In 2000, in Germany, 510 out of every 1000 people aged 18 to 29 owned their own car. By 2015 that figure will have decreased to 335 out of every 1000 young adults. For those aged 30 to 39, by comparison, car ownership in 2000 stood at 870 per 1000; in 2015 the number is expected to be 785.

Public transportation, instead, is increasingly important for younger people, says Knie, who wants to find solutions to future mobility issues that optimize links between car manufacturers, energy providers and public transportation networks.

Read the full article in German by Klaus Lockschen

photo - Susa Tom

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Ideas

A Journey Into The Dark Heart Of British Racism, Past And Present

For an Indian growing up in the UK in the 1960s, racism was an everyday experience ranging from schoolyard taunts to threats of violence and persecution. And with the recent revelations of abuse suffered by Pakistan-born cricket star Azeem Rafiq, overt racism is still very much alive. in British society.

Cricket player Azeem Rafiq

Shyam Bhatia*

-Essay-

LONDON — Azeem Rafiq’s recent disclosures about the racist taunts endured during his years as a first class English cricketer are as revealing about how some deeply ingrained prejudices still prevail as they are instructive about changing national attitudes of recent times.

Off spinner Rafiq is 30 year old, so may not appreciate the deeper and wider context of racism that has flourished for the past half century and more. Apologists would certainly argue that racism has abated in recent years and that many in the white majority are less willing to tolerate the questionable standards of earlier times. Certainly, Blacks and Asians today are present and more welcome than ever before in advertising, entertainment, the media and even front rank politics where an ethnic Indian, Rishi Sunak, is routinely touted as a possible future prime minister.

Keep reading... Show less
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ