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Tel Aviv University
Tel Aviv University
Shay Asperil

TEL AVIV — A record number of undergraduate students will get their degrees this year. But what awaits them isn't pretty: job insecurity, bosses who are indifferent to what they studied, a shortage of jobs that match their education and talents, and big debts accumulated during their years at university. All of this suggests that perhaps we should rethink the conventional wisdom that a bachelor’s degree is necessary to get ahead in life.

There are nearly 300,000 students registered in Israel’s higher education institutions. Some (medical and architecture students, for example) have no other choice because the profession they’ve chosen requires a degree. But most students aren’t studying for a specific profession, but just to get a degree so they can say they have one.

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Lisa Berdet, Lila Paulou, Anne-Sophie Goninet and Bertrand Hauger

👋 Sveiki!*

Welcome to Thursday, where more Ukrainian soldiers surrender in Mariupol, Sri Lanka defaults on its debt,and George W. Bush offers an epic geopolitical gaffe. Meanwhile, Lili Bai in Chinese-language digital media The Initium looks at what’s driving the current “expat exodus” at play in Shanghai.

[*Latvian]

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