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food / travel

Belle Époque Glamor Coming Back To Harrods — In Buenos Aires

Architects plan to restore one of the Argentine capital's architectural gems, but with new co-working and co-living spaces that reflect the latest trends.

Harrods in Buenos Aires
Harrods in Buenos Aires
Karina Niebla

BUENOS AIRES Entering Harrods — the luxury store in Buenos Aires, not London — one feels as one might have felt boarding the Titanic. The comparison is not far-fetched: both were built with British capital, and before World War I. And just like the Titanic, the Buenos Aires store also displays the plush splendor of the Belle Époque, still alive today: with ample spaces, a carousel on the second floor, countless lamps, typewriters and chairs, and the use of materials like cast iron, marble, bronze and oak that are meant to last.

The Buenos Aires Harrods, closed for over two decades, is no longer just a memory. It is set for a full restoration and a revival as a department store, but with a contemporary touch. The new space is to include gourmet eateries, apartments and offices with public terraces. The traditional barber shop, which remains one of the building's best-preserved sections, will be opened up again. The restoration project, which is being reviewed by the city government and waiting for approval, would last over three years and cost $60 million. The building is also up for sale.

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The Mural ‘St. Javelina’ depicting a Madonna holding a javelin anti-tank missile that has been crucial for the Ukrainian defense, has been painted on a building of the Solomianskyi district of Kyiv.

Lila Paulou and Lisa Berdet.

👋 Hafa adai!*

Welcome to Friday, where Russia warns Ukraine about attacks inside its territory, a video of deadly Brazilian police violence sparks outrage and a grandmother in New Zealand takes on Elon Musk and Tesla. We also feature a story from Buenos Aires daily Clarin about "Agrotokens," a way that farmers in Argentina are turning surplus grain into a kind of tangible cryptocurrency.

[*Chamorro, Mariana Islands]

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