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Barbecue Traditions Around The World

By Patrick Randall

On June 21, the Swedish Barbecue Team won the European Barbecue Championship that took place in the heavenly town of Znin, in Poland. With 24 teams participating in eight different events that included cooking pork ribs, beef briskets or fish, this competition was one of the high points of the year for the world’s grilled meat enthusiasts.

The WBQA (World Barbecue Association), which was founded in 1977 in South Africa’s Cape Town, defines barbecuing as “a leisure-time sport” that “shall become, on all continents, a lifestyle that promotes peace and connects people.” Although vegans or vegetarians may not agree with such a statement, there is no doubt that grilling meat with one’s family or friends on a sunny weekend still remains a beloved activity around the world.

We know about the famous American barbecue, which reaches its apex on July 4, with its beef burgers and pork ribs. But what do they eat during these smoky gatherings, also called “BBQs” or “barbies”, in other countries? If you’re not hungry yet, prepare to be: here is a tour of the world’s best barbecue traditions.

Cover photo: Zou Zheng/Xinhua/ZUMA

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Green

Fading Flavor: Production Of Saffron Declines Sharply

Saffron is well-known for its flavor and its expense. But in Kashmir, one of the flew places it grows, cultivation has fallen dramatically thanks for climate change, industry, and farming methods.

Photo of women harvesting saffron in Kashmir

Harvesting of Saffron in Kashmir

Mubashir Naik

In northern India along the bustling Jammu-Srinagar national highway near Pampore — known as the saffron town of Kashmir —people are busy picking up saffron flowers to fill their wicker baskets.

During the autumn season, this is a common sight in the Valley as saffron harvesting is celebrated like a festival in Kashmir. The crop is harvested once a year from October 21 to mid-November.

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