When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Changing attitudes
Changing attitudes
Barbara Reinhold

BUENOS AIRES - They're the daughters of Argentina's upper class, and they go to the most prestigious and traditional high schools in the country.

Today, the differences in school curriculum for boys and girls are shrinking, and the social role that girls “are expected” to meet is being tied increasingly to the values imparted to them by their families -- rather than to what their schools teach them to be.

They go to private high schools: usually Catholic, bilingual, with international exams, music recitals in English and well-manicured sports fields.

Sofia, 26, went to Michael Ham Memorial College, a girls-only school. She says of the experience: "While it's a traditional school that aims to bring different values to help form a person’s identity, it gives a lot of importance to the educational role of each family. No school defines a person completely or is the ‘definitive learning’ in life. Also, the social standing of the people who attend these schools is quite defined, higher middle class, so the families have more or less the same values."

Compared to past years, there aren't as many gender differences visible in the curriculum presented in the elite educational institutions. Sandra Ziegler, a researcher at the Latin American Social Sciences Institute (FLASCO) and author of The Education Of Elites: An Approach To The Socialization Of Young People From Advantaged Areas In Argentina Today, explains: "In academic terms, there are no visible differences between boys and girls. But now that we are digging a little deeper into the day-to-day life of the school, we might probably find that messages and curriculum do indeed differ according to gender.”

Sofia concurs: "I don't feel that traditional schools are encouraging women to be obedient housewives anymore. On the contrary, these schools encourage young women to play an active role in society. It's a paradigm that is being seen now but it was the opposite for our parents’ generations."

Catalina, 17, is finishing at Carmen Arriola de Marín high school in December. "The differences between boys and girls are in sports. The girls play hockey and the boys rugby," she says matter-of-factly.

Another enduring difference is the uniforms. Boys wear trousers while the girls wear skirts, even on the coldest days of winter. Whether it’s on purpose or not, it’s emblematic of woman’s “supposed role,” which is something from another era. Although, Catalina says, in her school when it's very cold they can wear tracksuits.

University courses that are chosen at the end of school are much more varied nowadays. Sofia says: "There are economists, lawyers, doctors, designers, journalists, communicators. I’m also seeing more and more girls who chose professions in healthcare or social work. But this is not so much about the traditional role of women than it is about personal values.”

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

New Probe Finds Pro-Bolsonaro Fake News Dominated Social Media Through Campaign

Ahead of Brazil's national elections Sunday, the most interacted-with posts on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Telegram and WhatsApp contradict trustworthy information about the public’s voting intentions.

Jair Bolsonaro bogus claims perform well online

Cris Faga/ZUMA
Laura Scofield and Matheus Santino

SÂO PAULO — If you only got your news from social media, you might be mistaken for thinking that Jair Bolsonaro is leading the polls for Brazil’s upcoming presidential elections, which will take place this Sunday. Such a view flies in the face of what most of the polling institutes registered with the Superior Electoral Court indicate.

An exclusive investigation by the Brazilian investigative journalism agency Agência Pública has revealed how the most interacted-with and shared posts in Brazil on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Telegram and WhatsApp share data and polls that suggest victory is certain for the incumbent Bolsonaro, as well as propagating conspiracy theories based on false allegations that research institutes carrying out polling have been bribed by Bolsonaro’s main rival, former president Luís Inácio Lula da Silva, or by his party, the Workers’ Party.

Agência Pública’s reporters analyzed the most-shared posts containing the phrase “pesquisa eleitoral” [electoral polls] in the period between the official start of the campaigning period, on August 16, to September 6. The analysis revealed that the most interacted-with and shared posts on social media spread false information or predicted victory for Jair Bolsonaro.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ