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RADIKAL, KEHABER (Turkey), FINANCIAL TIMES (UK)

Worldcrunch

ISTANBUL - A Turkish education union has pressed charges over the distribution of anti-Semitic books to schools in Istanbul’s Maltepe district, the daily Radikal reported.

“The books include phrases that are unscientific, anti-Semitic, anti-Armenian and humiliate Christians, non-religious people and people with a left-wing philosophy," read a statement issued by the Egitim-Sen union. The organization has accused the editor of carrying out a “ Hate Crime,” Kehaber reports.

The book in question depict Charles Darwin as a Jewish man with a big nose, who keeps company with monkeys, according to the Financial Times. Over 1,000 copies of the book were handed out to primary school children for free.

Ahmet Sirri Arvas, the editor of the books, spoke to Radikal about the incident, saying that a few friends put the content together, which is what lead to such terms being used. “The books were only handed out to 1000 children and will be amended to meet professional standards as soon as possible,” he said.

The Egitim Sen Union has taken legal action again Arvas. "We want the books impounded, and all those responsible held accountable for their part in their distribution into the hands of 10-year-old children," said Mehmet Aydogan, chief of the union's Istanbul bureau.

Aydogan has criticized the publisher for discrediting artists worldwide and forcing students to think unscientifically.

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China

How China's Mass Protest Took The World By Surprise — And Where It Will End

China is facing its biggest political protests in decades as frustration grows with its harsh Zero-COVID strategy. However, the real reasons for the protests run much deeper. Could it be the starting point for a new civic movement?

Photo of police during protests in China against covid-19 restrictions

Security measures during a protest against COVID-19 restrictions

Changren Zheng

In just one weekend, protests spread across China. A fire in an apartment block in Urumqi in China’s western Xinjiang region killed 10, with many blaming lockdown rules for the deaths. Anti-lockdown demonstrations spread to Beijing, Shanghai, Wuhan, Chengdu and other cities. University students from more than half of China's provinces organized various protests against COVID restrictions.

Why and how did the movement spread so rapidly?

At the core, protesters are unhappy with President Xi Jinping's three-year-long Zero-COVID strategy that has meant mass testing, harsh lockdowns, and digital tracking. Yet, the general belief about the Chinese people was that they lacked the awareness and experience for mass political action. Even though discontent had been growing about the Zero-COVID strategy, no one expected these protests.

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