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CLARIN

After Trees Cut Down In Front Of Coke Billboard, Company Must Plant 60 New Ones

It happened in Buenos Aires, and though the Coca-Cola Company denies axing the trees, it has agreed to plant dozens of new ones.

After the trees were cut down
After the trees were cut down

BUENOS AIRES — The Coca-Cola Company is being forced to plant 60 trees in the Argentine capital after six trees that had been "blocking" one of its billboards were cut down. Coca-Cola officials deny that anyone associated with the company cut the trees.

The trees were found sawed down in the central Belgrano district of Buenos Aires earlier this week. Coke's representatives met with city planning official Patricio Di Stefano to tell him they would abide by the decision to plant established trees at least three meters high.

Di Stefano told Clarin that he doesn't believe Coca-Cola cut down the six trees, but the company's billboard lacked the relevant permits. City prosecutors are investigating both the tree-cutting and the possible permit violations. In Argentina, cutting down trees can be punishable by a prison term of between three months and four years.

Suspicions first arose when employees of the Environment Ministry found that trees blocking the Coke poster had been cut, while four others that were not in the way had been left intact.

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Photo of the ​USS Antietam maneuvering in the Philippine Sea, just as the U.S. and Philippines forces announce the reinforcement of a defense pact, which will provide the United States with expanded access to Filipino military bases.

USS Antietam maneuvers in the Philippine Sea, just as the U.S. and Philippines forces announce the reinforcement of a defense pact, which will provide the United States with expanded access to Filipino military bases.

Emma Albright, Inès Mermat and Anne-Sophie Goninet

👋 Bone die!*

Welcome to Thursday, where top European officials arrive in Ukraine for talks, Israel launches airstrikes on the West Bank, and Australia snubs King Charles on its new banknote. Meanwhile, Claudio Andrade in Buenos Aires-based daily Clarin reports on the armada of 500 fishing boats who gather yearly off the coast of southern Argentina for an "industrial harvest."

[*Sardinian, Italy]

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