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El Pibe de Oro on the world's front pages
El Pibe de Oro on the world's front pages
Bertrand Hauger

El Pibe de Oro, Barrilete, El Dios, Cósmico, D10S, Dieguito, El 10, El Diez ...

The quantity of nicknames is just one more sign that fútbol legend Diego Armando Maradona was in a category of his own. His death Wednesday from a heart attack at the age of 60 was a bonafide global event.

Here are the front pages of 22 newspapers dedicated to the passing of the soccer legend: from dailies in his native Buenos Aires to the cities of his beloved club teams, Naples, Italy and Barcelona, Spain, but also California, France, India and beyond celebrated arguably the greatest artist that the beautiful game has ever seen.

ARGENTINA

Cronica, a daily newspaper in Maradona

Cronica

Clarin

La Nacion

Pagina/12

Portada de La Prensa (Argentina)

La Prensa



BRAZIL

Portada de Extra (Brasil)

Extra/O Globo

O Estado de S. Paulo



COLOMBIA

Portada de Vanguardia Liberal (Colombia)

Vanguardia



UNITED STATES

Los Angeles Times



FRANCE

Portada de L

L'Equipe

Libération



ITALY

Il Mattino (Naples)

Portada de Corriere dello Sport (Italy)

Corriere dello Sport

Portada de La Gazzetta dello Sport (Italy)

La Gazzetta dello Sport

Portada de Il Messaggero (Italy)

Il Messaggero



SPAIN

La Vanguardia(Barcelona)

Portada de As (Spain)

As

La Razon



UK

Mirror Sport

https://i.eurosport.com/2020/11/26/2943752.jpg

The Guardian


GERMANY

Germany

Die Welt



INDIA

Hindi-language newspapers in India also ran front-page tributes to the footballing legend

Ananda Bazar

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IL MATTINO
Italian daily newspaper published in Naples.
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CLARIN
Clarin is the largest newspaper in Argentina. It was founded in August 1945 and is based in Buenos Aires.
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LIBERATION
Libération is a French left-leaning daily. Co-founded by Jean-Paul Sartre in 1973, it later moved away from its original far-left and anti-advertising stance to embrace a social-democrat view. It was acquired by Israeli businessman Patrick Drahi in 2014.
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LA VANGUARDIA
La Vanguardia is a leading daily based in Barcelona, published in both Spanish and Catalan. It was founded in 1881.
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O ESTADO DE S. PAULO
Founded in 1875, O Estado de S. Paulo is a daily newspaper based in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Owned by Grupo Estado, it is the city's second-largest newspaper, and is economically liberal.
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LA PRENSA
La Prensa is a Spanish-language Mexican daily, owned by Organizacion Editorial Mexicana. It was founded in 1928 and is headquartered in Mexico City.
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O GLOBO
O Globo is a nationwide Brazilian newspaper based in Rio de Janeiro. It was founded in 1925 and is one of the cornerstones of the media conglomerate Organizações Globo, led by businessman Roberto Marinho.
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LA NACION (ARGENTINA)
La Nacion is one of Argentinia's most read dailies. Like its main rival Clarín, it was also known as a major opposition newspaper while the Kirchners were in power, from 2003 to 2015. La Nacion has received several awards and some of the most prominent writers of the Spanish-speaking world have appeared in its columns.
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LOS ANGELES TIMES
The Los Angeles Times, commonly referred to as the Times or LA Times, is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California, since 1881. It is currently owned by the Chicago-based Tribune Publishing company.
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LA RAZON
La Razon is a conservative daily newspaper based in Madrid with local editions in many other Spanish cities, including Barcelona or Seville.
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Future

Injecting Feminism Into Science Is A Good Thing — For Science

Feminists have generated a set of tools to make science less biased and more robust. Why don’t more scientists use it?

As objective as any man

Anto Magzan/ZUMA
Rachel E. Gross

-Essay-

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, a mystery played out across news headlines: Men, it seemed, were dying of infection at twice the rate of women. To explain this alarming disparity, researchers looked to innate biological differences between the sexes — for instance, protective levels of sex hormones, or distinct male-female immune responses. Some even went so far as to test the possibility of treating infected men with estrogen injections.

This focus on biological sex differences turned out to be woefully inadequate, as a group of Harvard-affiliated researchers pointed out earlier this year. By analyzing more than a year of sex-disaggregated COVID-19 data, they showed that the gender gap was more fully explained by social factors like mask-wearing and distancing behaviors (less common among men) and testing rates (higher among pregnant women and health workers, who were largely female).

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