Geopolitics

Released From Jail, Bahrain's Freedom Fighter Rides Again

Released in late May after two years in prison, Nabeel Rajab has taken his cause to foreign capitals. But will the West challenge the oil-rich nation's human rights record.

PARIS — It's only been a month since he was released from a Bahrain prison, and Nabeel Rajab is already right back in the fray.

Rajab had been convicted of provocation and participation in illegal protests, which had begun in Bahrain in the middle of February 2011 in the capital of Manama, as the Arab Spring's pro-democracy movements swept through the region.

Watch Video Show less

U.S.-Iraq Ultimatum, Long Live Felipe VI, Assange's 729 Days

Thursday, June 19, 2014

U.S. WANTS MALIKI GONE
U.S. officials are increasing pressure on the Iraqi government, warning that the U.S. won’t intervene militarily to stop the barbaric ISIS fighters until Iraq Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki steps down, British newspaper The Independent reports. Speaking to the BBC this morning, Maliki’s spokesman rejected calls for his resignation, arguing that the PM had won parliamentary election just two months ago. He also drew comparisons between the situation in Iraq and “the Nazi occupation of Europe,” describing “a similar situation to Rwanda, where there is going to be genocide, and we are having mass killings already.”

Keep reading... Show less

Bahrain Court Upholds Sentence Against Activists Leaders

BBC NEWS, THE GUARDIAN (UK), WASHINGTON POST, THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (US)

Worldcrunch

Keep reading... Show less
Geopolitics

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing


A R A B I C A
ارابيكا

By Kristen Gillespie

Watch Video Show less
Geopolitics

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing


A R A B I C A
ارابيكا

By Kristen Gillespie

Watch Video Show less
Geopolitics

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing


A R A B I C A
ارابيكا

By Kristen Gillespie

Watch Video Show less
Geopolitics
Nathalie Gillet

Shiites Step Up Protests As Bahrain Teeters Between Reform And Repression

Authorities in Bahrain have lifted the state of emergency first put in place in April, when police began cracking down hard on the country’s Arab Spring-inspired protest movement. Tensions, however, remain palpable as talks that were supposed to ease the

MANAMA -- Bahrain's Shiite villages and neighborhoods have been playing a dangerous game since the country's state of emergency was lifted on June 1.

In Bilad al-Qadeem, a modest suburb on the western edge of Bahrain's capital, Manama, the clock has just struck 4 p.m. An hour from now an "unauthorized" demonstration, organized via Twitter, is scheduled to begin. Though the weather is very hot, some small groups of three or four people are nevertheless waiting near the entrance of a house or between two cars. They know that nearby riot police are already patrolling the neighbourhood. All the approach roads have been closed off. Nearby the open space where the demonstration is supposed to start, about 20 young women have already gathered. "Clear out Hamad!" they shout to the king.

Watch Video Show less
Geopolitics
Kristen Gillespie

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing


A R A B I C A
ارابيكا

WHAT IS THE LIMIT?
A Turkish grassroots campaign to "welcome our Syrian brothers to our country" is organizing a caravan to transport citizens from Istanbul on July 16th to the Turkish-Syrian border where refugees are staying. Calling the effort "For Syria – we will go to the limit" (the Arabic word for limit also means border, creating a play on words), organizers write it will be "a day to support Syrian refugees in Turkey. Your brothers are there and they need your help." The convoy leaves on the 15th from Istanbul and arrives at the refugee camps along the border the next day.

Watch Video Show less
Geopolitics

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing


A R A B I C A
ارابيكا

By Kristen Gillespie

Watch Video Show less
Geopolitics
Laure Stephan

In Bahrain, Pakistani Immigrants Targeted In Shiite-Sunni Clash

As Shiite-led protests against the Sunni royal family are met with a violent crackdown, some in the Shiite majority have started to lash out at Pakistani immigrants, who are Sunni.

MANAMA - His blue pickup truck is piled up with mattresses, suitcases and a refrigerator. Mohammad returned to the Momin Mosque neighborhood, in the heart of Bahrain's cosmopolitan capital Manama, only to collect his belongings. Of Pakistani origin, Mohammad fled the neighborhood a week earlier. He now starts the car, which he will drive to Al-Muharraq, a town in the northern part of the capital that he considers more secure.

Just a few steps from his former home, traditional Pakistani shalwar kameez (baggy trousers and long shirts) are still hanging along the walls of a house that must have been hurriedly abandoned. All the doors of the nearby houses are tightly locked. Momin Mosque is slowly losing all its Pakistani residents.

Watch Video Show less
Geopolitics

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing

GADDAFEED Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi delivered a virulent, often rambling television address, directly threatening violence against his people and declaring himself "the eternal leader of the revolution."

Watch Video Show less
Geopolitics
Laure Stephan

Is Bahrain Different? Demonstrators Must Overcome Shia-Sunni Divide

Will the Bahraini royal family be the next Arab domino to fall? As pro-democracy demonstrations in Bahrain enter a second week, protestors hold fast in the face of brutal army repression.

MANAMA – Like a river that has burst its banks, the flood of words is relentless. On the Pearl Square roundabout, the meeting point for protestors in the heart of the Bahraini capital Manama since February 14, a young man talks about the ongoing uprising, and its repression. Others gather around him. Everyone wants to explain something, add a detail. Most of the protesters are young, between 20 and 35 years old.

They feel compelled to talk. Because "the kingdom of Bahrain is going through a historic moment, and without the foreign media our movement will be suffocated," says Ahlam, a 32-year-old teacher dressed in the traditional Abaya, trendy jeans and shoes poking out the bottom. Because they see themselves as heirs to the revolution coursing through the Arab world: "If the regime falls, the uprising will spread to neighboring gulf countries," says Ahmad, a young businessman. Because they feel they have been cheated by the authorities when the state television channel doesn't show any footage of their protests.

Watch Video Show less
EXPLORE OTHER TOPICS