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Germany

The Awkward State Of Being Greek In Germany Right Now

A visit with Munich's surprisingly robust Greek community finds families caught in the middle of Europe's unfolding existential drama. Or tragedy.

Munich's Greek influence.
Munich's Greek influence.
Thomas Anlauf, Jutta Czeguhn, Franz Kotteder and Jakob Wetzel

MUNICH — Three large cranes stand tall against the blue sky, but they're standing still. At the construction site for the Greek school in Berg am Laim, a southern borough of Munich, all work has been temporarily halted. A red excavator lightly scrapes the brown soil with its shovel, rusty iron rods protruding from the shell of the building. It looks a bit like some Greek beaches, where half-built buildings remain unfinished, investor money having run out.

Fourteen years ago, the city sold the more than 15,000-square-meter plot of land at Hachinger Bach Road to Greece, so that a central Greek school might be built for those in and around Munich. Only recently was the Ministry of Education and Religion in Athens able to begin work on the building. But Greece is already embroiled in litigation with the city. The future of the school remains uncertain.

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Ukrainian soldiers at the border of Russia

Meike Eijsberg, Anna Akage and Emma Albright

Ukrainian forces continue to regain more territory in the northeast of the country, and by Monday morning had announced that a battalion had reached the Russian border.

This comes after having taken back control of Kharkiv, the second biggest Ukrainian city, as Russian troops appear to be making a hasty retreat. This latest development continues to indicate the inability of Russian troops to dominate Ukrainian forces.

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After this successful counter-offensive, Ukraine’s defense ministry posted a video showing soldiers gathered around a yellow and blue painted post upon arrival at the Russian border. “Today the 15th of May, Kharkiv's territorial defense forces of Ukraine - 227th battalion, 127th brigade - went to the border with the Russian Federation,” said one soldier. “We are here.”

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