When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Germany

On The Trail Of The Fugitive Who Blew The Cover On Global Tax Evasion

After outing some high-profile tax evaders by selling Liechtenstein bank account information to investigators, Heinrich Kieber disappeared. Recently, he turned up in Australia, only to disappear again.

Liechtenstein police mug shot of Heinrich Kieber (2008)
Liechtenstein police mug shot of Heinrich Kieber (2008)
Uwe Ritzer

Heinrich Kieber travelled to Australia for the first time in the early 1990s. He brought his Jeep with him, and spent several months exploring the island continent. Then he reported the vehicle stolen, and got an insurance payout of 62,000 Australian dollars. He'd actually sold the car. Kieber was taking flying lessons, and one day without a word to anyone he disappeared. His Australian landlady, Margret Thompson, was left owed several thousand dollars in back rent.

Some 20 years later, again in Australia, and Kieber's done it again – disappeared. This time, his cover was blown. The now 46-year-old Kieber is one of the most wanted men on the planet. When he worked for the Liechtensteiner Fürstenbank LGT, he secretly copied the account information of some 5,800 clients from around the world, many of whom were hiding money in Liechtenstein to evade taxes. Among the repercussions: in February 2008, along with hundreds of less high-profile LGT clients in Germany, former Deutsche Post boss Klaus Zumwinkel was publicly outed for tax evasion.

Keep reading... Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

NATO Entry For Sweden And Finland? Erdogan May Not Be Bluffing

When the two Nordic countries confirmed their intention to join NATO this week, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan repeated his plans to block the application. Accusing Sweden and Finland of' "harboring" some of his worst enemies may not allow room for him to climb down.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO

Meike Eijsberg

-Analysis-

LONDON — When Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared his opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO, it took most of the West's top diplomatic experts by surprise — with the focus squarely on how Russia would react to having two new NATO members in the neighborhood. (So far, that's been a surprise too)

But now Western oversight on Turkey's stance has morphed into a belief in some quarters that Erdogan is just bluffing, trying to get concessions from the negotiations over such a key geopolitical issue.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

To be clear, any prospective NATO member requires the consent of all 30 member states and their parliaments. So Erdogan does indeed have a card to play, which is amplified by the sense of urgency: NATO, Sweden and Finland are keen to complete the accession process with the war in Ukraine raging and the prospect of strengthening the military alliance's position around the Baltic Sea.

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ