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Economy

Oh Mon Dieu! English Invades French Workplace

Getting ahead these days in the land of Baudelaire and Balzac means mastering the language of Shakespeare – or at least, Zuckerberg. No longer just a plus, strong English is often required for both entry level and top manager slots. But it's brou

Is English invading the French workplace? (Guillaume Cattiaux/mcaretaker)
Is English invading the French workplace? (Guillaume Cattiaux/mcaretaker)
Laurance N’Kaoua

PARIS - Employment agency Manpower is advertising for an Accounts Manager: "English – fluent." Logica, a business and management consultancy, needs a support technician: "English – fluent." Health and Security services organization International SOS is recruiting a client support specialist: "English – bilingual." These advertisements, published by the Management Recruitment Agency (Apec), prove what everyone already knows: in business, speaking English is "un must!"

And with good reason: whether the company is trying to establish a foothold in local markets, collaborating with international researchers, selling its products outside of France or employing a foreign manager, English is the need-to-know language.

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Geopolitics

The Days After: What Would Happen If Putin Opts For A Tactical Nuclear Strike

The risk of the Kremlin launching a tactical nuclear weapon on Ukraine is small but not impossible. The Western response would itself set off a counter-response, which might contain or spiral to the worst-case scenario.

An anti-nuclear activist impersonates Vladimir Putin at a rally in Berlin.

Yves Bourdillon

-Analysis-

PARISVladimir Putin could “go nuclear” in Ukraine. Yes, this expression, which metaphorically means “taking the extreme, drastic action,” is now literally considered a possibility as well. Cornered and humiliated by a now plausible military defeat, experts say the Kremlin could launch a tactical nuclear bomb on a Ukrainian site in a desperate attempt to turn the tables.

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In any case, this is what Putin — who put Russia's nuclear forces on alert just after the start of the invasion in late February — is aiming to achieve: to terrorize populations in Western countries to push their leaders to let go of Ukraine.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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