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Ukraine Zoo Out Of Money, Animals Begin To Starve

KHARKIV — There’s a critical situation in the eastern Ukrainian city of Kharkiv, and it doesn't involve human rights. If the city zoo doesn’t get more money by Monday, officials say the animals there will begin to die of starvation.

Zoo director Aleksey Yakovlev says that there is a pregnant elephant named Tandy who is on the verge of exhaustion and the staff fear that she is on the verge of a miscarriage and death.

The money for the zoo is allocated by the city, buhe last payment from the Treasury was in January for 1 million Ukrainian hryvnia ($106,000), reportsKomsomolskaya Pravda. It takes about 20,000 hryvnia ($2,100) every day to feed the animals.

The zoo has set up a bank account and is pleading for donations from animal lovers. The account details can be found here.

Photos via CC: Mikhail Koninin / russavia / Benh LIEU SONG / StuSeeger / la_skri via Instagram / Worldcrunch

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Society

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

The recent shooting of Takeoff, a rapper, is another sad incident of gun crime in the U.S. But those blaming hip hop culture for contributing to gun violence ignore that rappers themselves are also victims. And the real point is that in today's America, nobody is safe from gun violence.

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

Fans wait outside State Farm Arena in Atlanta to attend the memorial service for Migos rapper Takeoff on Nov. 11

A.D. Carson

Add the name of Takeoff, a member of the popular rap trio Migos, to the ever-growing list of rappers, recent and past, tragically and violently killed.

The initial reaction to the shooting to death of Takeoff, born Kirsnick Ball, on Nov. 1, was to blame rap music and hip hop culture. People who engaged in this kind of scapegoating argue that the violence and despairing hopelessness in the music are the cause of so many rappers dying.

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