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Cameron at 10 Downing Street Friday, announcing he would step down
Cameron at 10 Downing Street Friday, announcing he would step down

SPOTLIGHT: BREXIT WINS, CAMERON'S BAD BET

No one ever forced David Cameron to call the referendum to decide whether the UK should stay in the European Union or not. But the British Prime Minister's calculation was clear: Popular sentiment against the EU (particularly among his fellow Conservative Party members) was strong enough to make a vote necessary to settle the question — but not strong enough to actually pull out of the bloc. Well, Mr. Cameron made the miscalculation of his political career. By early this morning, the result was in: The British voted 52% to 48% in favor of having the island nation split with its continental partners, a historic decision with powerful economic, political and cultural ramifications. Cameron, himself, quickly announced that he will resign. The rest of the fallout will come in the coming hours, weeks … and years.

  • CLEAR VICTORY, HUGE TURNOUT Voter turnout was remarkably strong. At nearly 72%, it was the highest in a referendum since 1991. The UK's various parts were split by the vote, with 53.4% of voters in England and 52.5% in Wales backing Britain's exit. But both Scotland and Northern Ireland were in favor of the UK remaining in the bloc, according to results published by the BBC.
  • CAMERON RESIGNS The Prime Minister, who has been in office since 2010, wasted little time in announcing his decision, saying he wasn't the right person to lead the country as it separates from the EU. Showing poise and restraint as he spoke at Downing Street, Cameron reiterated that he believed Britain was better off as part of the EU, but respected the will of the British people. He said he will hold his post for three months to support the transition to a new leader, who will take over by the time of a Conservative party conference in October. Watch Cameron's speech expand=1] here.
  • MARKETS BATTERED, POUND PLUNGES The British currency plunged to a 30-year low in early trading after the Brexit victory, with the euro sliding as well. Meanwhile stock prices have taken a huge hit in trading from Asia to Europe, with European bank shares leading the losses. Read more from Reuters.
  • DOMINO EFFECT? The rest of the world is wondering whether the UK vote is just the first step toward total disintegration of the EU. The leader of France's far-right National Front party Marine Le Pen has already applauded Britain's decision to leave, and called for a similar referendum to take place in France, Le Monde reports. "Frexit" anyone? Should Brexit really trigger a domino effect, Quartz has thankfully provided us with a list of possible names for all EU exits.
  • MESSY DIVORCE Uncertainty now reigns on the status of European residents in the UK and British citizens in the EU. Other questions include who will fill Cameron's shoes, the impact of the vote on Britain's borders and the direction of negotiations between the UK and its trade partners. Still, much of the change will not be immediate, with the parties having two years to negotiate the terms of the British departure from European institutions and agreements.
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Society

End Of Roe v. Wade, The World Is Watching

As the Supreme Court decides to overturn the 1973 decision that guaranteed abortion rights, many fear an imminent threat to abortion rights in the U.S. But in other countries, the global fight for sexual and reproductive rights is going in different directions.

"Don't abort my right" At 2019 pro-choice march In Toulouse, France.

Alain Pitton/NurPhoto via ZUMA
Hannah Steinkopf-Frank and Sophia Constantino

PARIS — Nearly 50 years after it ensured the right to abortion to Americans, the United States Supreme Court overturned the Roe v. Wade case, meaning that millions of women in the U.S. may lose their constitutional right to abortion.

The groundbreaking decision is likely to set off a range of restrictions on abortion access in multiple states in the U.S., half of which are expected to implement new bans on the procedure. Thirteen have already passed "trigger laws" that will automatically make abortion illegal.

U.S. President Joe Biden called the ruling "a tragic error" and urged individual states to enact laws to allow the procedure.

In a country divided on such a polarizing topic, the decision is likely to cause major shifts in American law and undoubtedly spark outrage among the country’s pro-choice groups. Yet the impact of such a momentous shift, like others in the United States, is also likely to reverberate around the world — and perhaps, eventually, back again in the 50 States.

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