[rebelmouse-image 27090373 alt="""" original_size="750x1152" expand=1]

Die Tageszeitung, July 25

The Monday edition of Berlin-based daily Die Tageszeitung shows how, in the span of just a few days, Germans are suddenly faced with terrorism and attempted mass killings. With a photograph of survivors exiting from Friday's deadly attack in a Munich shopping center, the newspaper asks how to react to any such mass killing attack.

Friday's attack, which left nine dead, was indeed not carried out in the name of Islam — unlike others that have struck Germany in the past week. Yet, another attack came late Sunday when a Syrian migrant set off an explosion in southern Germany near a music festival in the city of Ansbach, which killed himself and wounded a dozen others. According to Bavaria's interior minister, the attacker was driven by religious extremism.

The perpetrator was denied asylum in the country a year ago, although he was allowed to remain in Germany because of the ongoing conflict in Syria, and was about to be deported to Bulgaria. The man had repeatedly received psychiatric treatment, and previously attempted suicide.

This is the fourth attack in a week in Germany. A 21-year-old Syrian refugee was arrested on Sunday after killing a pregnant woman and injuring two other people with a machete near Stuttgart. The Munich attack was carried out by an 18-year-old with German-Iranian. The country's authorities have been on high alert ever since another teenager armed with an axe and a knife wounded five people on a train in northern Bavaria, last Monday, an act that has been claimed by ISIS.

Government critics blame these violent attacks on German Chancellor Angela Merkel's liberal refugee policy. According to Reuters, a leader of the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany (AfD) posted on Twitter a message after the Munich shooting that said, "Merkel's unity party: Thank you for the terror in Germany and Europe!" The message was later deleted. Last year, Germany welcomed an estimated 1 million migrants.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Green

Inside Sweden's "100,000-Year" Solution To Bury Nuclear Waste

As experts debate whether nuclear power can become another leading renewable energy source, Sweden has adopted a first-of-its-kind underground depository for nuclear waste — and many countries are following their lead.

At Sweden's Oskarshamn nuclear power plant

Carl-Johan Karlsson

As last fall’s climate summit in Glasgow made it clear that the world is still on route for major planetary disaster, it also brought the question of nuclear power squarely back on the agenda. A growing number of experts and policymakers now argue that nuclear energy deserves many of the same considerations as wind, solar and other leading renewables.

But while staunch opponents to nuclear may be slowly shifting their opinion, and countries like France, the UK and especially China plan to expand their nuclear portfolios, one main question keeps haunting policymakers: how do we store the radioactive waste?

In Sweden, the government claims to have found a solution.

Keep reading... Show less
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ