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Die Tageszeitung, July 25

The Monday edition of Berlin-based daily Die Tageszeitung shows how, in the span of just a few days, Germans are suddenly faced with terrorism and attempted mass killings. With a photograph of survivors exiting from Friday's deadly attack in a Munich shopping center, the newspaper asks how to react to any such mass killing attack.

Friday's attack, which left nine dead, was indeed not carried out in the name of Islam — unlike others that have struck Germany in the past week. Yet, another attack came late Sunday when a Syrian migrant set off an explosion in southern Germany near a music festival in the city of Ansbach, which killed himself and wounded a dozen others. According to Bavaria's interior minister, the attacker was driven by religious extremism.

The perpetrator was denied asylum in the country a year ago, although he was allowed to remain in Germany because of the ongoing conflict in Syria, and was about to be deported to Bulgaria. The man had repeatedly received psychiatric treatment, and previously attempted suicide.

This is the fourth attack in a week in Germany. A 21-year-old Syrian refugee was arrested on Sunday after killing a pregnant woman and injuring two other people with a machete near Stuttgart. The Munich attack was carried out by an 18-year-old with German-Iranian. The country's authorities have been on high alert ever since another teenager armed with an axe and a knife wounded five people on a train in northern Bavaria, last Monday, an act that has been claimed by ISIS.

Government critics blame these violent attacks on German Chancellor Angela Merkel's liberal refugee policy. According to Reuters, a leader of the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany (AfD) posted on Twitter a message after the Munich shooting that said, "Merkel's unity party: Thank you for the terror in Germany and Europe!" The message was later deleted. Last year, Germany welcomed an estimated 1 million migrants.

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How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

American and Southwest Airlines have been refusing to allow Cubans on board flights if they've been blacklisted by the government in Havana.

How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

Boarding a plane in Camaguey, Cuba

Santiago Villa

On Sunday, American Airlines refused to let Cuban writer Carlos Manuel Álvarez board a Miami flight bound for Havana. It was at least the third time this year that a U.S. airline refused to let Cubans on board to return to their homeland after Havana circulated a government "blacklist" of critics of the regime. Clearly undemocratic and possibly illegal under U.S. law, the airlines want to make sure to cash in on a lucrative travel route, writes Colombian journalist Santiago Villa:

-OpEd-

Imagine for a moment that you left your home country years ago because you couldn't properly pursue your chosen career there. It wasn't easy, of course: Your profession is not just singularly demanding, but even at the top of the game you might not be assured a stable or sufficient income, and you've had to take on second jobs, working in bars and restaurants.

This chosen vocation is that of a writer or journalist, or perhaps an artist, which has kept you tied to your homeland, often the subject of your work, even if you don't live there anymore.

Since leaving, you've been back home several times, though not so much for work. Because if you did, you would be followed in cars and receive phone calls to let you know you are being watched.

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