When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!

HINDUSTAN TIMES, (Pakistan), KUWAIT NEWS AGENCY (Kuwait), RFI, LE FIGARO (France)

Worldcrunch

A woman traveling from Pakistan’s eastern city of Lahore to Paris via Milan fell asleep on the flight, only to be woken up 18 hours later at her starting point, reports Kuwait News Agency (KUNA).

She woke up expecting to enjoy the glories of the French capital, says RFI, only to discover she was back in Pakistan.

Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) are investigating how ground crew failed to notice the woman during the plane’s stopover in Paris, according to the Hindustan Times.

The Pakistani airline sent her back to Paris today on another flight, writes le Figaro. As there was no PIA flight to Paris, she was asked to pay for the extra ticket back to France.

After protests from her family, the airline promised to pay for the ticket, says RFI.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Economy

Post-Pandemic Reflections On The Accumulation Of State Power

The public sector has seen a revival in response to COVID-19. This can be a good thing, but must be checked carefully because history tells us of the risks of too much control in the government's hands.

photo of 2 nurses in india walking past graffiti that says "democracy'

Medical students protesting at Calcutta Medical Collage and Hospital.

Sudipta Das/Pacific Press via ZUMA
Vibhav Mariwala

-Analysis-

NEW DELHI — The COVID-19 pandemic marked the beginning of a period of heightened global tensions, social and economic upheaval and of a sustained increase in state intervention in the economy. Consequently, the state has acquired significant powers in managing people’s personal lives, starting from lockdowns and quarantine measures, to providing stimulus and furlough schemes, and now, the regulation of energy consumption.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest