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Seas And Oceans Being 'Emptied of Fish,' Nature Fund Warns

BOGOTA — The World Wildlife Fund has sounded the alarm across the planet's sea and oceans. "In just one generation, human activity has seriously harmed the ocean by catching fish faster than they can reproduce, while destroying their feeding zones," the director general of World Wildlife Fund International Marco Lambertini declared, as the WWF publishes its Living Blue Planet report.

El Espectador reports on the view from Latin America, with findings of a stark fall in all marine life numbers — with reductions of up to 75% for some species — since the 1970s. "The pressure on our seas is unprecedented" in Latin America, the regional head of WWF, Roberto Troya, told El Espectador. In addition to overfishing, climate change is both warming and acidifying the seas, leading to their destruction as living habitats.

Photo: ePi.Longo

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Society

Can Men Help Breastfeed Their Children?

In a tribe in central Africa, male and female roles are practically interchangeable in caregiving to children. Even though their lifestyle might sound strange to the West, it offers important life lessons about who raises children — and how.

Photo of a marble statue of a man, focused on the torso

No milk — but comfort and warmth for the baby

Ignacio Pereyra

The southwestern regions of the Central African Republic and the northern Republic of Congo are home to the Aka, a nomadic tribe of hunter-gatherers who, from a Western point-of-view, are surprising because male and female roles are practically interchangeable.

Though women remain the primary caregivers, what is interesting is that their society has a level of flexibility virtually unknown to ours.

While the women hunt, the men care for the children; while the men cook, the women decide where to settle, and vice versa. This was observed by anthropologist Barry Hewlett, a professor at Washington State University, who lived for long periods alongside the tribe. “It is the most egalitarian human society possible,” Hewlett said in an interview.

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