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Saudi Female Student Death Blamed On Gender Segregation
RIYADH – Amna Bawazeer, a student at an all-women's university campus in Saudi Arabia, had lived and studied for years with a heart condition. But activists say that her death from a heart attack on campus Thursday was the fault of Saudi Arabia's strict gender segregation laws.
After Bawazeer collapsed suddenly while attending school, female administrators of the girls campus of King Saud University panicked, attempting to aid her on their own, Al Arabiya reports. And when male paramedics finally arrived, they were not allowed to enter the campus.
Some reports say the emergency workers, who included Bawazeer's brother, were forced to wait outside the university for as long as two hours before they were let inside to try to aid Bawazeer. University officials deny that there was any delay letting them in.
Bawazeer was later pronounced dead, sparking an outpouring of grief and anger on Arabic news sites and social media.
A Yemeni media twitter account lamented, "Amna Bawazeer is the victim of extremism in Saudi Universities."
— اعلام الثورة المرئي (@CVMRYemen) 7 Février 2014

A Saudi woman tweeted, "As usual, our news is painful. We try to cope with this society because it is our destiny. May Amna Bawazeer rest in peace and may her soul remain with God in paradise."

كالعادة اخبارنا مؤلمة لنحاول التأقلم مع هذا االمجتمع لأنه قدرنا ...اللهم ارحم امنة باوزير واسكنها �سيح الجنان

— reemalhejazeah (@reemalhejazeah) 7 Février 2014
(photo: Tampa Bay Times/ZUMA)

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Lionel To Lorenzo: Infecting My Son With The Beautiful Suffering Of Soccer Passion

This is the Argentine author's fourth world cup abroad, but his first as the father of two young boys.

photo of Lionel Messi saluting the crowd

Argentina's Lionel Messi celebrates the team's win against Australia at the World Cup in Qatar

Ignacio Pereyra

I love soccer. But that’s not the only reason why the World Cup fascinates me. There are so many stories that can be told through this spectacular, emotional, exaggerated sport event, which — like life and parenthood — is intense and full of contradictions.

This is the fourth World Cup that I’m watching away from my home country, Argentina. Every experience has been different but, at times, Qatar 2022 feels a lot like Japan-South Korea 2002, the first one I experienced from abroad, when I was 20 years old and living in Spain.

Now, two decades later, living in Greece as the father of two children, some of those memories are reemerging vividly.

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