When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

blog

Russian Air Strikes Shake Up Syrian Conflict

[rebelmouse-image 27089473 alt="""" original_size="750x1081" expand=1]

Al-Akhbar, Oct. 1, 2015

"Toward a new Middle East," reads the front page of the Thursday edition of Lebanon's Arabic-language dailyAl-Akhbar, together with a picture of a Russian aircraft ready for take-off, as Moscow hits targets in Syria for a second day.

On Wednesday, Moscow launched a series of airstrikes against what it said were Islamist extremist positions inside Syria. According to Lebanon's al-Mayadeen TV, quoted by BBC News, a series of new strikes took place Thursday, targeting rebel positions in the northwest held by an alliance known as the Army of Conquest.

The Russian intervention in the Syrian conflict has elicited anger from American officials who are accusing Moscow of aiming at western-backed rebels in the region — not ISIS fighters, as it claims. For The New York Times, the country's entry in the war is an effort to help Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, whom Russian President Vladimir Putin has vowed to support.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

India Higher Education Inferior Complex: Where Are The Foreign University Campuses?

The proposed UGC guidelines are ill-conceived and populist, and hardly take note of the educational and financial interests of foreign universities.

Image of a group of five people sitting on the grass inside of the Indian Institute of Technology campus.

The IIT - Indian Institute of Technology - Campus

M.M Ansari and Mohammad Naushad Khan

NEW DELHI — Nearly 800,000 young people from India attend foreign universities every year in search of quality education and entrepreneurial training, resulting in a massive outflow of resources – $3 billion – to finance their education. These students look for greener pastures abroad because of the lack of quality teaching and research in most of India’s higher education institutions.

Over 40,000 colleges and 1,000 universities are producing unemployable graduates who cannot function in a knowledge- and technology-intensive economy.

The Indian government's solution is to open doors to foreign universities, with a proposed set of regulations aiming to provide higher education and research services to match global standards, and to control the outflow of resources. But this decision raises many questions.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest