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Vanguard, May 19, 2016

Newspapers in Nigeria on Thursday reported the bittersweet good news of the rescue of one of the 276 schoolgirls abducted by Islamic terrorist group Boko Haram two years ago.

Amina Ali, now 19, was found wandering in the Sambisa Forest near the Nigeria-Cameroon border Wednesday with a baby girl she gave birth to four months ago. The two were found, along with a man who declared himself to be her husband, and who has since been identified as a member of Boko Haram.

The news comes as the Nigerian military was set to launch an assault in the same region against Boko Haram, called Operation Crackdown, the Lagos-based Vanguard daily reports.

Amina Ali told authorities she'd been held captive in a village in the Sambisa forest with 60 other women, including former classmates.

The April 2014 mass abduction at the boarding school in Chibok, Nigeria sparked global outrage and the "Bring Back Our Girls" campaign that put pressure on the Nigerian government to intensify the fight against Boko Haram. Of the 276 girls abducted, several dozen quickly escaped. Authorities say more than 200 remain captive.

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