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Folha de S. Paulo, April 18, 2016

"Impeachment!" reads the front page of leading Brazilian daily Folha de S. Paulo on Monday, a day after Brazil's lower house of Parliament voted in favor of starting impeachment proceedings against President Dilma Rousseff.

The embattled president faces accusations that she manipulated budget figures to secure her reelection in late 2014. A total of 367 deputies — some of them pictured cheering on the daily's front page — voted for impeachment, while 137 voted against.

Rousseff, who lost a last-minute attempt to halt the vote, "won't stop the fight," attorney general José Eduardo Cardozo commented. "If anybody thinks she's going to bow, they're wrong," Folha de S. Paulo quotes him as saying.

The case now moves on to the Senate, where a vote is expected to take place next month.

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War In Ukraine, Day 281: Top European Leader Pushes Xi Jinping To Use His Influence On Putin

Charles Michel and Xi-Jinping

Cameron Manley, Bertrand Hauger and Emma Albright

European Council Chief Charles Michel used much of his face-to-face meeting Thursday in Beijing with Xi Jinping to urge the Chinese President to use his sway over Russian President Vladimir Putin “to end the war and to respect the sovereignty of Ukraine.”

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Michel’s visit was the first official trip to Beijing by a top EU leader since the pandemic. The three-hour sit down (considered quite long for Xi) also included discussion of human rights, Taiwan, trade relations and climate change.

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