Hawksbill Turtles Thought Extinct Now Back On Colombia's Beaches

Six years ago, people thought the endangered hawksbill sea turtle had become extinct in one of its habitats, the American Pacific coast. But, as it turns out, they haven't quite yet.

After several were spotted months back in Colombia's Gorgona national park, Colombian investigators and collaborators from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) began searching for more along the country's Pacific coast. They found six in September on a beach in the Utría national park, which suggested there were more nearby, says El Espectador.

Specialist Alexander Gaos deemed it a "historic expedition" and the park was providing hope that the turtles might survive along the Pacific coast. The expedition found a total of 11 turtles, who were given a medical checkup, then registered and released.

Two were tagged so their movements could be monitored, this being crucial to their conservation, according to the biologist Diego Amorocho. There is no guarantee the species would survive, he added, with just 500 female turtles thought to remain in the Americas. "Certain communities covet their eggs and the beaches where they reproduce are overtaken by buildings as well as pollution."

He said he saw one turtle nearby "30 years ago, when I first came to Utría, and was always convinced this was an important place for them. We can confirm now that this was true."

Photo: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region

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Society

Germany's Legendary Clubbing Culture Crashes Museum Space

The exhibition “Electro” in Düsseldorf is an unlikely tribute to a joyful and uninhibited club culture, with curators forced to contend with limits of a museum setting ... and another COVID lockdown.

A woman with a "Techno" tattoo in front of the famous Berghain

Boris Pofalla

DÜSSELDORF — The last party at the Berghain nightclub in Berlin lasted from Saturday evening until Monday morning. On the first weekend of December, some clubbers lined up for nine hours outside the former power plant – and still didn’t make it past the doormen. A friend said that dancing in the most famous techno club in the world on its last evening was like landing a spot in the last lifeboat to leave the sinking Titanic on 14 April 1912.

It is surely a coincidence that the first comprehensive exhibition charting the 100-year history of electronic music in Germany opened in the same week that nightclubs across the country were forced to close. It wasn’t planned that way, but it’s like opening an exhibition about the cultural history of alcohol the day after the introduction of prohibition.

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