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French acting legend Gérard Depardieu said he was surrendering his French passport after France's prime minister called his move to Belgium for tax reasons "pathetic."

The acting legend had come under criticism last week for declaring permanent residency in the Belgian town of Néchin – allegedly to duck out on France's new 75% tax on its wealthiest resident.

In an open letter to French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault in France's weekly Le Journal Du Dimanche, Depardieu said that over a period of 45 years he has paid 145 million euros in taxes and employed 80 people.

"Gégé" seems adamant on leaving France – but why choose to hole up in Belgium when there are plenty of other perfectly good places where the wine-loving, plane-urinating, trouble-stirring screen icon could move?

Here are our suggestions:

1. Green (White And Red) Card

Renouncing French cuisine must be tough for such a famous bon vivant... The mussels and waffles in Belgium might get boring after a while, so why not move to Italy?

2. Kampai, Depardieu-san!

Knowing that Depardieu, a renowned vineyard owner, is already co-president of the Saké Drinkers Association, looking for a new home in Japan seems quite natural.


3. Cyrano de Uzbekistan


The acting legend has also made himself famous for lending legitimacy to the autocratic regimes of Uzbekistan's President Islam Karimov and Chechen ruler Ramzan Kadyrov... Why not just move there altogether?


4. Astérix & Obélix in Congo

The now XXL 63-year-old became a cinema icon in 1974 after appearing (much more slimly) in the ramshackle roadmovie Les Valseuses – with several scenes involving Depardieu in his birthday suit. Sea, sex and sun? Let's go to Congo!


5. The ultimate tax evasion

Nobody's going to ask you to pay taxes on the moon, though the ride in the space suit might prove as tricky as on an Air France plane in case "Gégé" needs to take a leak...

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Society

What Jesus Really Said: Fixing The Mistranslations That Have Shaped Christianity

Jesus spoke Aramaic, but the Bible has been translated from Greek. Many mistaken translations of the Gospels have skewed the development of Christianity — and the course of history. It's time to let the Bible be retranslated to let its true message be known.

Biblical errors?

Franz Alt

BERLIN — Jesus spoke Aramaic. It was his mother tongue and 2,000 years ago it was the main language throughout the Middle East. The New Testament, however, is translated from Greek into all the languages of the world. Aramaic expert and theologian Günther Schwarz (who died in 2009) was dissatisfied with the classical translation and studied Aramaic every day for 50 years in order to better understand Jesus in his native language. In doing so, he came to the realization that about half of all Jesus' words in the gospels were mistranslated or even deliberately falsified.

His shocking conclusion: “What Christians believe, Jesus did not teach! And what Jesus taught — the Christians do not know.” The theologian has written 20 books and around 100 scientific articles about Jesus and Aramaic. He sent his findings to all German-speaking bishops. Response: zero.

So, as a journalist, I want to use my Jesus books to educate people about Günther Schwarz's findings.

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