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French Family Wins Fight To Keep Pet Fox

French Family Wins Fight To Keep Pet Fox

GARDONNE — A French family have won the right to keep their pet fox, Zouzou. Under French law foxes are considered wild animals and, therefore, cannot be kept as domestic pets.

After a nearly three year legal battle, a court last month gave Zouzou the right to remain in the Delanes family care for the rest of his life.

After they found him alongside the corpse of his mother in 2011, the family decided to keep him. “He’s very cuddly,” said Anne-Paul Delanes, “even more than a dog. When he sees us he rolls on the ground and cries in sheer joy!”

The National Office of Hunting and Wild Fauna discovered Zouzou’s presence and ordered the family to release it into the wild. A lawsuit was filed against the Delanes family and they were ordered to pay a fine of 300 euros, reported Le Parisien.

But ultimately, after two appeals, they obtained the Certificate of Capacity — essential to keep a wild animal.

Photo by the Delanes Family via 20minutes.

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Geopolitics

Smaller Allies Matter: Afghanistan Offers Hard Lessons For Ukraine's Future

Despite controversies at home, Nordic countries were heavily involved in the NATO-led war in Afghanistan. As the Ukraine war grinds on, lessons from that conflict are more relevant than ever.

Photo of Finnish Defence Forces in Afghanistan

Finnish Defence Forces in Afghanistan

Johannes Jauhiainen

-Analysis-

HELSINKI — In May 2021, the Taliban took back power in Afghanistan after 20 years of international presence, astronomical sums of development aid and casualties on all warring sides.

As Kabul fell, a chaotic evacuation prompted comparisons to the fall of Saigon — and most of the attention was on the U.S., which had led the original war to unseat the Taliban after 9/11 and remained by far the largest foreign force on the ground. Yet, the fall of Kabul was also a tumultuous and troubling experience for a number of other smaller foreign countries who had been presented for years in Afghanistan.

In an interview at the time, Antti Kaikkonen, the Finnish Minister of Defense, tried to explain what went wrong during the evacuation.

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“Originally we anticipated that the smaller countries would withdraw before the Americans. Then it became clear that getting people to the airport had become more difficult," Kaikkonen said. "So we decided last night to bring home our last soldiers who were helping with the evacuation.”

During the 20-year-long Afghan war, the foreign troop presence included many countries:Finland committed around 2,500 soldiers,Sweden 8,000,Denmark 12,000 and Norway 9,000. And in the nearly two years since the end of the war, Finland,Belgium and theNetherlands have commissioned investigations into their engagements in Afghanistan.

As the number of fragile or failed states around the world increases, it’s important to understand how to best organize international development aid and the security of such countries. Twenty years of international engagement in Afghanistan offers valuable lessons.

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