Three-time winner of the World Surf League Mick Fanning had a lucky escape after he had to fend off a shark in the middle of Sunday's final in Jeffreys Bay, in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa.

South African daily Cape Times put the incident on its front page Monday, with pictures of the 34-year-old Australian swimming away after he was knocked off his board. "I was just sitting there when I felt something get stuck in my leg rope," explained Fanning afterwards. "It kept coming at my board and I was kicking and screaming." He walked away unhurt, with only a broken leg rope, though he was visibly shaken.

Fanning and fellow finalist Julian Wilson were rescued promptly and the event was cancelled, with both surfers agreeing to take second place and splitting the prize money.

The entire incident was broadcast live on television, and the commentators obviously shocked as they tried to explain what was happening.

Speaking later to a reporter, Fanning added that he managed to punch the shark in the back. Watch expand=1] the full video here.

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ABOUT THE SOURCE: The Cape Times is a daily newspaper published in English since 1876. It is printed in Cape Town, South Africa.

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Geopolitics

Taliban Redux, Cleaned-Up Image Can't Mask Their Cruel Reality

Twenty years later the Islamist group is back in power in Afghanistan, but trying this time to win international support. Now that several months have passed, experts on the ground can offer a clear assessment if the group has genuinely transformed on such issues as women's rights and free speech.

The Taliban have now been in power for almost five months

Atal Ahmadzai and Faten Ghosn

The international community is closely monitoring the Taliban, after the group re-seized power in Afghanistan in August 2021.

There is legitimate reason for concern. The Taliban are again ruling through fear and draconian rules.

The Taliban’s last regime, in the mid-1990s, was marked by human rights violations, including massacres, mass detentions and rape. The regime collapsed on Nov. 14, 2001, shortly after the U.S. launched its global war on terrorism.

Even after the Taliban officially fell from power, their subsequent two decades of insurgency produced various gross human rights violations, an encompassing term under international human rights law.

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