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The Star, Sept. 11, 2015

"One Giant Step," Friday's Johannesburg-based The Star reads, celebrating the discovery of Homo naledi, a new human-like species, in a South African cave.

A team led by Kansas-born paleontologist Lee Rogers Berger (pictured here kissing a skull replica of a skull of the Homo naledi) dug up more than 1,500 bones belonging to at least 15 people in a burial chamber deep in a cave system near Johannesburg — and thousands more are still expected to be excavated, scientific journal Elife reports. The species could have lived in Africa up to 3 million years ago.

According to the researchers, this discovery could change ideas about our human ancestors.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: The Star is a South African, English-language daily newspaper. It was founded in 1871 and is headquartered in Johannesburg.

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Nepalese Hindu devotees offer ritual prayer on the banks of the Hanumante River

Anne-Sophie Goninet, Bertrand Hauger and Jane Herbelin

👋 Привет!*

Welcome to Tuesday, where China further clamps down its COVID controls, Saudi Arabia launches air raids on the Yemeni capital and Indonesia gets a new capital. Meanwhile Les Echos’ Théophile Simon finally sees brighter days at hand in Iraq, during an extensive tour of the reconstruction efforts around the country.

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