The victory of challenger Muhammadu Buhari in the presidential election in Nigeria, Africa's biggest and richest country, was making big headlines around the world Wednesday. At home, the daily Nigerian Tribune covered the results and reactions of Buhari's victory over incumbent president Goodluck Jonathan.

Buhari polled a total of 15.4 million votes, according to the Independent National Electoral Commission, while 12.8 million Nigerians voted for Jonathan.

Buhari, who was Nigeria’s head of state from December 1983 to August 1985 after taking power in a military coup, hailed his victory as a “historic” vote for change and a sign that democracy is progressing in the region. "Our country has now joined the community of nations that have used the ballot box to peacefully change an incumbent president in a free and fair election," he said in a speech Wednesday at his party headquarters in the capital Abuja.

The 72-year-old president-elect, a Muslim of the All Progressives Congress (APC), has congratulated his opponent Jonathan for peacefully conceding defeat, describing him as a “worthy opponent.” Despite some allegations of fraud, the election was generally praised by observers, particularly amidst threats from Islamist terror group Boko Haram.

Read more from the BBC.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: The Nigerian Tribune is the country’s oldest private daily. It was established in 1949 and is published in Ibadan, Nigeria’s third largest city.

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