After days of fighting, "Palmyra's fate is now in the hands of IS," L’Orient Le Jour writes on Thursday's front page. Coalition forces thought a few days ago that they had managed to beat back the ISIS terror group from the ancient Syrian city, but the jihadists came back stronger than before. Government and rebel forces fled the city, where ISIS is now in control.

Palmyra is home to many historical ruins and artwork, such as the Temple of Bel, built in the first century. As The Guardian explains, ISIS fighters have demonstrated before that they have no regard for archeological sites such as those in the Iraqi city in Mosul, which they destroyed earlier this year.


ABOUT THE SOURCE: L’Orient Le Jour is a French-language newspaper in Lebanon. It was founded in 1971 after the merger of L’Orient and Le Jour.

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Society

Germany's Legendary Clubbing Culture Crashes Museum Space

The exhibition “Electro” in Düsseldorf is an unlikely tribute to a joyful and uninhibited club culture, with curators forced to contend with limits of a museum setting ... and another COVID lockdown.

A woman with a "Techno" tattoo in front of the famous Berghain

Boris Pofalla

DÜSSELDORF — The last party at the Berghain nightclub in Berlin lasted from Saturday evening until Monday morning. On the first weekend of December, some clubbers lined up for nine hours outside the former power plant – and still didn’t make it past the doormen. A friend said that dancing in the most famous techno club in the world on its last evening was like landing a spot in the last lifeboat to leave the sinking Titanic on 14 April 1912.

It is surely a coincidence that the first comprehensive exhibition charting the 100-year history of electronic music in Germany opened in the same week that nightclubs across the country were forced to close. It wasn’t planned that way, but it’s like opening an exhibition about the cultural history of alcohol the day after the introduction of prohibition.

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