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Vanguard, March 09, 2015

Niger and Chad launched major joint ground and air strikes against Boko Haram in Nigeria Sunday, one day after the militants formally pledged allegiance to ISIS and killed at least 50 in Maiduguri, the birthplace of Boko Haram in northeastern Nigeria.

The joint military operation represents a new regional push to end the terrorist group's six-year insurgency.

Nigerian daily Vanguard features a front-page photo of victims receiving treatment after Saturday's four bomb blasts — the worst attacks in the country since Boko Haram members tried to seize the town earlier this year.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: Vanguardis a daily newspaper based in Lagos, Nigeria. It was founded in 1983.

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Society

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

The recent shooting of Takeoff, a rapper, is another sad incident of gun crime in the U.S. But those blaming hip hop culture for contributing to gun violence ignore that rappers themselves are also victims. And the real point is that in today's America, nobody is safe from gun violence.

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

Fans wait outside State Farm Arena in Atlanta to attend the memorial service for Migos rapper Takeoff on Nov. 11

A.D. Carson

Add the name of Takeoff, a member of the popular rap trio Migos, to the ever-growing list of rappers, recent and past, tragically and violently killed.

The initial reaction to the shooting to death of Takeoff, born Kirsnick Ball, on Nov. 1, was to blame rap music and hip hop culture. People who engaged in this kind of scapegoating argue that the violence and despairing hopelessness in the music are the cause of so many rappers dying.

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