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La Repubblica, April 20, 2015

"The Migrant Apocalypse." Rome-based daily La Repubblica, like other newspapers around Italy and the world, featured the deadly accident in the Mediterranean Sea on the front page of its Monday edition. Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi called the traffic of undocumented immigrants a "new slave trade."

The newspaper featured both news reports and commentary on the immigration crisis facing Africa and Europe, with Italy and Libya caught on the front line. At least 700 people are thought to have died Sunday after a boat that left the Libyan coast bound for Sicily capsized. There have been reports that up to 1,000 were on the boat, and only 28 have been rescued. It is believed to be the worst maritime disaster in Europe since World War II.

Civil-war ravaged Libya has become a major hub for human traffickers since the NATO intervention and the fall of the regime of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011. Up to 1,500 migrants are thought to have perished crossing the Mediterranean since the beginning of 2015. European Union leaders are holding an emergency summit in Luxembourg on Monday to discuss a common response to the ongoing migrant crisis. Read more from the BBC ad check our collection of world front pages.


ABOUT THE SOURCE: La Repubblica was founded in 1976 by the Gruppo Editoriale L’Espresso. It is now based in Rome and has a centre-left political stance.

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Society

Journalism In A Zero-Trust World: Maria Ressa Speaks After Rappler Shut Down Again

The Rappler CEO and Nobel Peace Prize winner spoke with The Wire's Arfa Khanum Sherwani about how journalists everywhere need to prepare themselves for the worst-case scenario of government-ordered closure and what they should do to face up to such a challenge.

Maria Ressa, Filipino journalist, author and Nobel Peace Prize laureate

Arfa Khanum Sherwani

HONOLULU — For someone who’s just been ordered to shut down the news website she runs, Rappler CEO Maria Ressa is remarkably cheerful about what may happen next.

In a speech she gave to a conference at the East-West Center here on challenges the media face in a “zero trust world”, Ressa said that she and her colleagues were prepared for this escalation in the Philippines government’s war on independent media and will carry on doing the work they do. “If you live in a country where the rule of law is bent to the point it’s broken, anything is possible…. So you have to be prepared.”

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