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Wednesday's killing of TV station WDBJ reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward by fired station employee Vester Flanagan, left Virginia in a "state of shock," as described by local daily The Roanoke Times Thursday, alongside a picture of a community vigil for the slain journalists.

The live, on-camera shooting, together with its immediate diffusion through social media, also sent instant ripples across the world.

Spanish daily La Razon was one of many foreign newspapers to run a chilling screengrab of the attacker's video on its Thursday front page. Most U.S. dailes opted not to publish images of the attack, as websites and TV stations also debated the merits of showing the frightening video.

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ABOUT THE SOURCE: The Roanoke Times is the primary newspaper in Southwestern Virginia. It was founded in 1886.

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Society

Lionel To Lorenzo: Infecting My Son With The Beautiful Suffering Of Soccer Passion

This is the Argentine author's fourth world cup abroad, but his first as the father of two young boys.

photo of Lionel Messi saluting the crowd

Argentina's Lionel Messi celebrates the team's win against Australia at the World Cup in Qatar

Ignacio Pereyra

I love soccer. But that’s not the only reason why the World Cup fascinates me. There are so many stories that can be told through this spectacular, emotional, exaggerated sport event, which — like life and parenthood — is intense and full of contradictions.

This is the fourth World Cup that I’m watching away from my home country, Argentina. Every experience has been different but, at times, Qatar 2022 feels a lot like Japan-South Korea 2002, the first one I experienced from abroad, when I was 20 years old and living in Spain.

Now, two decades later, living in Greece as the father of two children, some of those memories are reemerging vividly.

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