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La Razon de Mexico, July 13

"He left by this hole," reads the front page of La Razon de Mexico"s Monday edition, a day after Mexican drug lord Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzman's escaped for the second time from a ­maximum security prison.

Guzman — who already escaped from another Mexican maximum security prison in 2001, with the help of prison guards — had been incarcerated for the last 18 months in the Altiplano federal facility, in the Santa Juana neighborhood of Almoloya de Juárez, in the State of Mexico Altiplano.

According to the Mexican daily, the head of the Sinaloa cartel had only been in prison for four months when he began plotting his underground getaway; on Sunday, Guzman broke out of the facility through a hole dug in his shower area that led to a mile-long tunnel.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: La Razon de Mexico is a daily newspaper headquartered in Mexico City.

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Geopolitics

North Korea And Nukes: Why The World Is Obliged To Try To Negotiate

How to handle a nuclear armed pariah state is not a simple question.

North Korea And Nukes: Why The World Is Obliged To Try To Negotiate

North Korea's missile launch during a news program at the Yongsan Railway Station in Seoul

Alexander Gillespie

The recent claim by Kim Jong Un that North Korea plans to develop the world’s most powerful nuclear force may well have been more bravado than credible threat. But that doesn’t mean it can be ignored.

The best guess is that North Korea now has sufficient fissile material to build 45 to 55 nuclear weapons, three decades after beginning its program. The warheads would mostly have yields of around 10 to 20 kilotons, similar to the 15 kiloton bomb that destroyed Hiroshima in 1945.

But North Korea has the capacity to make devices ten times bigger. Its missile delivery systems are also advancing in leaps and bounds. The technological advance is matched in rhetoric and increasingly reckless acts, including test-firing missiles over Japan in violation of all international norms, provoking terror and risking accidental war.

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