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Authorities in Macedonia have accused ethnic Albanians from Kosovo of planning violent unrest in the country after a Saturday police raid against an armed group early left 14 militants and eight police officers dead, the BBC reports. Officials said that the group had been "neutralized" and a massive weapons cache seized. Because of the region’s

instability in recent decades, NATO Chief Jens Stoltenberg urged "everyone to exercise restraint and avoid any further escalation." Read more from AFP.

On its front page, Macedonian daily Nova Makedonija profiles the policemen who lost their lives. As the world pays respect and marks the 70th anniversary of the World War II victory over fascism, the newspaper noted the poignancy and timing of Macedonia and its armed forces having to confront a new form of fascism through terrorist attacks and violence.

ABOUT THIS SOURCE: Nova Makedonija (New Macedonia) is the oldest daily newspaper in the Republic of Macedonia. The first edition was published on Oct. 26,1944, in Gorno Vranovci, and constitutes the first document written after the codification of Standard Macedonian.

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Ideas

How Turkey Can Bring Its Brain Drain Back Home

Turkey heads to the polls next year as it faces its worst economic crisis in decades. Disillusioned by corruption, many young people have already left. However, Turkey's disaffected young expats are still very attached to their country, and could offer the best hope for a new future for the country.

Photo of people on a passenger ferry on the Bosphorus, with Istanbul in the background

Leaving Istanbul?

Bekir Ağırdır*

-Analysis-

ISTANBUL — Turkey goes to the polls next June in crucial national elections. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is up against several serious challenges, as a dissatisfied electorate faces the worst economic crisis of his two-decade rule. The opposition is polling well, but the traditional media landscape is in the hands of the government and its supporters.

But against this backdrop, many, especially the young, are disillusioned with the country and its entire political system.

Young or old, people from every demographic, cultural group and class who worry about the future of Turkey are looking for something new. Relationships and dialogues between people from different political traditions and backgrounds are increasing. We all constantly feel the country's declining quality of life and worry about the prevalence of crime and lawlessness.

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