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"The Good King leaves, Salman becomes Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques," Asharq Al-Awsat writes on its front page after King of Saudi Arabia Abdullah bin Abdulaziz Al Saud died early Friday at age 90, three weeks after being hospitalized for pneumonia.

One of the many sons of Ibn Saud, the founder of modern Saudi Arabia, Abdullah ascended to the throne on Aug. 1, 2005. A "cautious reformer who succeeded in securing broader freedoms in the conservative kingdom but fell short in gaining greater independence for women," is how CNN remembered Abdullah.

Abdullah is succeeded by his 79-year-old half-brother Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, whose 2012 nomination as Crown Prince was described by Reuters as a sign that Abdullah's cautious reforms were likely to continue.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: Launched in London in 1978, and owned by a member of the Saudi royal family, Asharq Al-Awsat is one of the leading pan-Arab daily newspapers, printed in 14 locations internationally.

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How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

American and Southwest Airlines have been refusing to allow Cubans on board flights if they've been blacklisted by the government in Havana.

How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

Boarding a plane in Camaguey, Cuba

Santiago Villa

On Sunday, American Airlines refused to let Cuban writer Carlos Manuel Álvarez board a Miami flight bound for Havana. It was at least the third time this year that a U.S. airline refused to let Cubans on board to return to their homeland after Havana circulated a government "blacklist" of critics of the regime. Clearly undemocratic and possibly illegal under U.S. law, the airlines want to make sure to cash in on a lucrative travel route, writes Colombian journalist Santiago Villa:

-OpEd-

Imagine for a moment that you left your home country years ago because you couldn't properly pursue your chosen career there. It wasn't easy, of course: Your profession is not just singularly demanding, but even at the top of the game you might not be assured a stable or sufficient income, and you've had to take on second jobs, working in bars and restaurants.

This chosen vocation is that of a writer or journalist, or perhaps an artist, which has kept you tied to your homeland, often the subject of your work, even if you don't live there anymore.

Since leaving, you've been back home several times, though not so much for work. Because if you did, you would be followed in cars and receive phone calls to let you know you are being watched.

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