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Two very different tragedy-at-sea stories occupied the front page of Thursday's Rome-based daily La Repubblica.

The Italian island of Lampedusa was once again witness to the horror of would-be immigrants dying after setting out from North Africa in an attempt to reach European shores. As many as 300 people were feared dead after taking a boat from Libya. La Repubblica's headline called the situation the "Infinite Shame," and quoted Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi as calling on Europe as a whole to contribute to stemming the tide of desperate migrants making the perilous journey. Renzi also noted that the growing instability on the ground in Libya is contributing to people leaving the country.

Meanwhile, farther north along the Mediterranean was the setting of La Repubblica's centerpiece photograph showing Italian cruise ship captain Francesco Schettino, who was sentenced Wednesday to 16 years for his role in the deaths of 32 people in the January 2012 Costa Concordia sinking off the Italian island of Giglio. Prosecutors had asked for a 26-year sentence. Schettino will remain free as he appeals the verdict, which could take years to conclude.

Here's a video of Schettino, who has denied wrongdoing, saying "part of me died also on that day."

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Society

Let's Not Forget The Original Sin Of The Qatar World Cup: Greed

Soccer is a useful political tool for dictatorships. But Qatar is able to milk the World Cup as much as possible because the sport if infected by unbridled capitalistic greed.

Photo of a street in Doha, Qatar, with a building displaying a giant ad for the 2022 World Cup

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