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Le Parisien, April 30, 2015

"The French military at the heart of a scandal" reads the front page of French daily Le Parisien, following the revelation of accusations that 16 French soldiers sexually abused children in the Central African Republic between December 2013 and June 2014.

The allegations were kept secret until The Guardian published an article Wednesday based on a United Nations report revealing that 10 children had been sexually abused at refugee camp set inside M'poko airport, in Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, where French troops were posted in 2013 to try and stop the spreading of sectarian unrest in the country.

"If some soldiers have behaved badly, I will show no mercy," French President François Hollande was quoted as saying by Le Parisien. Meanwhile, the UN is threatening to fire the senior official in the organization who blew the whistle on the scandal, according to The Guardian.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: Le Parisien is a French daily newspaper covering international and national news, as well as extensive coverage of Paris and its suburbs. It was founded in 1944.

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Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Elon Musk bought Twitter in the name of absolute freedom. But numerous research shows that social media hate speech leads to actual violence. Musk and others running social networks need to strike a balance.

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Freedom on social networks can result in insults and defamation

Jean-Marc Vittori

-Analysis-

PARIS — Elon Musk is the world's leading reckless driver. The ever unpredictable CEO of Tesla and SpaceX is now behind a very different wheel as the new head of Twitter.

He began by banning remote work before slightly backtracking and authorizing it for the company’s “significant contributors.” Now he’s opened the door to Donald Trump to return to Twitter, while at the same time vaunting a decrease in the number of hate-messages that appear on the social network…all while firing Twitter’s content moderation teams.

But this time, the world’s richest man will have to make choices. He’ll have to limit his otherwise unconditional love of free speech. “Freedom consists of being able to do everything that does not harm others,” proclaimed the French-born Declaration of the Rights of Man in 1789.

Yet freedom on social networks results not only in insults and defamation, but sometimes also in physical aggression.

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